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2000-Level Courses

Rhetoric, Writing, and Communications


2000-Level Courses (PDF)

FALL TERM, 2020

Professional Style and Editing
RHET-2131
Section 001, Fall Term
Instruction Method: Nexus+(Synchronous + Asynchronous Components)
Schedule: Th 2:30-3:45PM
Instructor: Jaqueline McLeod Rogers 

This course teaches students to revise their prose, not for new ideas but for better phrasing of the ones they already have. Students will learn how to write in several prose styles and to edit each other's work professionally in terms of stylistic (rather than only grammatical) criteria. The course will include a number of short style exercises as well as longer essays, and a great deal of practice in editing. It will be a great help for anyone intending to write polished term papers or theses, not to mention business memos.

Rhetorical Criticism
RHET–2135
Section 001, Fall Term
Instruction Method: Nexus+(Synchronous + Asynchronous Components)
Schedule: TuTh 1:00-2:15PM
Instructor: Tracy Whalen 

Rhetoric has for 2500 years attracted bad press. It’s often seen as a synonym for trickery, bombast, lies, or empty words. We will challenge rhetoric’s maligned reputation by exploring various definitions of the term as developed by rhetorical theorists. We will discuss, with reference to everyday life, the consequential role rhetoric plays in bringing about connection and division between symbol users. Week by week, we will apply different rhetorical frameworks to study texts that argue against the norm, move us, shape our view of a situation—and ultimately do things. We will examine public address, media events, common metaphors, websites, and powerful social narratives. Always, you will be encouraged to look closely at how symbols encourage, obstruct and refine agreement and structure our attitudes and action.  

Contemporary Communication Theory
RHET-2137
Section 001, Fall Term
Instruction Method: Nexus+(Synchronous + Asynchronous Components)
Schedule: TuTh 10:00-11:15AM
Instructor: Shawn Moi

Whether it is in their engagement with contemporary media, their reception to the public apparatus of health communication, or their role in the activities of educational institutions, people constantly find themselves acting as agents of communication. In this course, students are introduced to some of the major contemporary theories and practices pertaining to individual and group communication. These theories include (but are not limited to) social construction, symbolic interactionism, cultural criticism, dramatism, hermeneutics, standpoint theory, ethics, relational theories, and gender-based approaches. In applying these theories to a variety of communicative situations, including those of everyday life, the connection between theory and practical applications will present students with opportunities for growth as communicators. Students in this class will also learn to become skillful critics of theories themselves and even engage in theory-building as they witness and contribute to ongoing debates amongst contemporary thinkers.   

Representations of Indigeneity
RHET–2141
Section 001, Fall Term
Instruction Method: Nexus+(Synchronous + Asynchronous Components)
Schedule: Tu 4:00-5:15PM
Instructor: Helen Lepp Friesen 

This course investigates the representation of Indigenous peoples in contemporary and historical forms of public communication such as text books, scholarship, government documents, internet, television, news media and public awareness campaigns, and how these representations contribute to perpetuating, challenging, or dispelling racist stereotypes and colonization practices. There is an emphasis on writing by emerging and established Indigenous writers and scholars on themed topics such as business and economics, history, politics, art, social movements, environment, and education. 

Communication & Pop Culture
RHET-2250
Section 001, Fall Term
Instruction Method: Nexus+(Synchronous + Asynchronous Components)
Schedule: Tu 2:30-3:45PM
Instructor: Matthew Flisfeder

This course examines the relationship between the rise of new media and discourses used to write about popular culture. The course looks at changing rhetorics of taste, from the nineteenth to the twentieth century, as new media made art and culture more accessible to the public.  The course also examines how new processes of mediated distribution of art changed the discursive strategies for writing about popular culture. Course topics include: the rise of photography and the technological reproducibility of images; mass media and the culture industry; technology and globalization; and augmented reality and video games.

FALL/WINTER TERM, 2020-2021

Tutoring Writing
RHET-2500
Section 001, Fall/Winter
Instruction Method: Live (Synchronous)
Schedule: Tu 1:00-2:15PM
Instructor: Helen Lepp Friesen

This course is designed to provide the theoretical and practical knowledge students will need to work as a writing tutor in the Department of Rhetoric, Writing, and Communications. The class meets once weekly throughout Fall and Winter terms. Readings in composition theory and in the principles of peer tutoring will introduce students to such topics as the composing process, methods of writing assessment, rhetorical expectations in academic writing, and the ethical responsibilities of tutors in a peer-tutoring relationship. Students enrolled in this course will be expected to be a part of the University of Winnipeg’s growing community of tutors by taking part in community-building, “shadow” existing tutors to learn about best practices in peer conferences, and commit to at least five hours of peer tutoring in the fall term.

WINTER TERM, 2021

Professional Style and Editing
RHET-2131
Section 002, Winter Term
Schedule: MW 4:00-5:15PM
Instructor: TBA

This course teaches students to revise their prose, not for new ideas but for better phrasing of the ones they already have. Students will learn how to write in several prose styles and to edit each other's work professionally in terms of stylistic (rather than only grammatical) criteria. The course will include a number of short style exercises as well as longer essays, and a great deal of practice in editing. It will be a great help for anyone intending to write polished term papers or theses, not to mention business memos.

Rhetorical Criticism
RHET–2135
Section 002, Winter Term
Schedule: MW 4:00-5:15PM
Instructor: Shawn Moi

This course is recommended for students whose interests extend beyond the kinds of literature traditionally studied in English courses. The emphasis will be on non-literary texts and on language used to persuade -- on media talk and advertising copy; on political speeches, campaigns, and editorials; on popular and professional essays. For the rhetorical critic, such uses of language are considered worthy of close analysis not because they have lasting aesthetic value, but because they reveal cultural values and social trends. Students in this course will examine a variety of nonfiction in order to develop the perspective of rhetorical criticism, which views language acts as responses to historical circumstances, addressed to particular audiences and motivated by particular goals. Contemporary, written texts will comprise the bulk of the reading in the course, but speeches and pre-modern texts may also be considered. In addition, students will be encouraged to find other readings (including those drawn from magazines, newspapers, and public relations platforms) that are suitable for rhetorical analysis.

Contemporary Communication Theory
RHET-2137
Section 002, Winter Term
Schedule: TuTh 11:30AM-12:45PM
Instructor: TBA

Communication theories explain the way human beings interact verbally, at levels ranging from the interpersonal to the organizational. In this course, students are introduced to some of the major contemporary theories and practices pertaining to individual and group communication. These theories include (but are not limited to) social construction, symbolic interactionism, cultural criticism, dramatism, hermeneutics, standpoint theory, ethics, relational theories, and gender-based approaches. Readings are drawn from contemporary North American and European theorists. A variety of written and oral assignments invite students to apply their understanding of these theories to practical, even everyday communicative situations.

Writing in Digital Spaces
RHET-2350
Section 001, Winter Term
Schedule: TuTh 10:00-11:15AM
Instructor: Helen Lepp Friesen

This course is designed as an introduction to reading, writing, and evaluating digital texts. Electronic devices are often used for composition and digital spaces as a medium for publication; innovations in digital media and spaces have introduced a new genre of art. In this course we will talk about the notion of writing in digital spaces in various forms and the variety of conventions unique to each genre. This course will give an overview of how digital writing can be used for a variety of purposes. Students will have the opportunity to write scripts for projects, develop, and produce stories using digital media. This course will also give students the opportunity to reflect on experiences using digital media, critically analyze digital media, and convey reasons for their digital choices. We will work on story development and the media and production process which will include story planning, preproduction, production, postproduction, and performance (Ohler, 2013). Students will have the opportunity to be interactive participants in creating and evaluating writing in digital spaces.

Updated: July 2020