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Cross-Listed Courses

Classics


CLAS-2004/3 Rise of the Old World Civilization

This course covers the origins and development of civilization in the Old World with emphasis on the prehistoric archaeological record. Topics discussed include the forces behind an increase in population density, the role of civilization and urbanism in state formation, and the problem of collapse of Old World Civilizations, such as ancient Egypt, the Near East, China, and the Indus Valley. Regional and chronological coverage may vary from year to year.

Cross-listed: Anthropology ANTH-2211/3


CLAS-2010/3 Topics in Classical Studies

This course explores a specific area in the field of Classical scholarship. The focus of study varies from year to year. Possible topics include ancient medicine, technology, economics, warfare, and the popular reception of the Classical tradition. Information concerning these course offerings is provided by the department.

Note: This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies.

Cross-listed: History HIST-2090/3


CLAS-2061/3 Sport in the Ancient Greek World

This course examines the origin and historical development of sport in ancient Greece, its religious and political implications, and the nature of events and contests. Particular attention is given to intellectual and popular attitudes towards sport and the contribution made by ancient Greece in this area to Western Civilization.

Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated.

Cross-listed: Kinesiology and Applied Health KIN-2061/3


CLAS-2062/3 Sport in the Ancient Roman World

This course examines the origin and historical development of sport in ancient Rome, its religious and political implications, and the nature of events and contests. Particular attention is given to intellectual and popular attitudes towards sport and the contribution made by ancient Rome in this area to Western Civilization.

Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated.

Cross-listed: Kinesiology and Applied Health KIN-2062/3


CLAS-2301/3 History of Archaic Greece

This course traces the history of Greece during the Archaic period from the beginning of the eighth century BCE through to the beginning of the fifth century BCE. Special emphasis is placed on the social, political and economic evolution of the Greek City-states (in particular Athens and Sparta), the failure of the Greeks to achieve political unity, cultural transformations, periods of warfare, and the Greeks' consequent vulnerability to external threats.

Cross-listed: History HIST-2080/3

(May not be counted toward a degree if student has taken the former course: CLAS-2091/HIST-2104/6 Ancient Greek History)


CLAS-2302/3 History of Classical Greece

This course traces the history of Greece from 800 BCE until the rise of Macedon. Special emphasis is placed on the social, political and economic evolution of the Greek city-states (in particular Athens and Sparta), the failure of the Greeks to achieve political unity, and their consequent vulnerability to external threats.

Cross-listed: History HIST-2089/3

(May not be counted toward a degree if student has taken the former course: CLAS-2091/HIST-2104/6 Ancient Greek History)

 


CLAS-2303/3 The History of the Roman Republic

This course considers the history of the Roman Republic from the legendary foundations of the city of Rome through to the beginning of the Roman Empire. Lectures trace the major cultural, military, and societal events of the Republic. Particular emphasis is placed upon the expansion of Rome's power throughout Italy and the Mediterranean, the forces that brought about the transformation of the Roman style of government from Monarchy to Republic, and later to Empire, and the problems which attended these changes.

Cross-listed: History HIST-2081/3

(May not be counted toward a degree if student has taken the former courses: History of Ancient Rome I and II or CLAS/HIST-2096/6 The History of Ancient Rome)


CLAS-2303/3 The History of the Roman Empire

This course considers the history of the Roman Empire from the end of the Roman Republic through to the reign of Constantine. Lectures trace the major cultural, military, and societal events of the first three centuries of the Empire. Particular emphasis is placed upon the expansion of Rome's power throughout the Mediterranean, Europe, and the Near East, the forces, individuals, and events that affect the Empire during the period 30 BCE-c.312 CE, and the problems that attended these changes.

Cross-listed: History HIST-2097/3

(May not be counted toward a degree if student has taken the former courses: History of Ancient Rome I and II or CLAS/HIST-2096/6 The History of Ancient Rome)


CLAS-2405/3 Staging Greek and Roman Drama

This course focuses on the staging of Greek and Roman tragedy and comedy. Examination of the surviving texts of selected plays, the remains of ancient theatres, contemporary accounts of dramatic performance and relevant artwork leads to a recreation of an ancient theatrical experience with information of stage configuration, scenery, masks, costumes, properties, gestures, dance, song, mechanical devices and stage convention. In addition to their written work, students are expected to participate in demonstrations and performance in class.

Cross-listed: Theatre and Film THFM-2405/3


CLAS-2702/3 Religion in Greece and Rome

This course will survey the religious beliefs and practices of the Greeks and Romans. Topics to be discussed will include the following: the worship of Olympian and Chthonic deities, oracles, orgiastic and mystery religions, Roman cults and rituals, Near Eastern religions, and the beginnings of Christianity.

Cross-listed: Religion and Culture REL-2237/3


CLAS-2750/3 Laughter, Love and Death: Introduction to Classical Literature I

Homer's Odyssey is a story of greetings and farewells, homecomings and departures, laughter and tears. Starting from a study of the Odyssey, this course traces emotions, gender relations, and human mortality across an assortment of works from the Ancient Mediterranean world. Students read texts in English translation from Archaic Greece to the Roman Empire, in verse and prose, across the genres of epic poetry, history, tragedy and comedy, oratory and more.

Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated.

Cross-listed: English ENGL-2750/3


CLAS-2800/3 Greek and Latin in Today's English

Of the 20,000 words in common use in English, about half have come from Latin, directly or through French. Greek, too, has made its contribution and continues to do so as the language of science expands. In addition to a thorough study of the formation of nouns, verbs, and adjectives from their Greek and Latin component parts, we will examine the Greek script, principles of transliteration, medical and scientific Greek, words from Greek mythology and society, Roman numerals, legal Latin, abbreviations of Latin words in common use, Latin mottoes and proverbs, and unusual plural forms in English. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required.

Cross-listed: Linguistics LING-2208/3


CLAS-2850/3 The Classical Roots of Medical Terminology

Knowledge of medical terminology equips students for a variety of fields. This course lays out the most important Greek and Latin roots of the vocabulary of contemporary medicine and demonstrates the predictable patterns by which these roots combine, introducing students to the concept of building language using root words, prefixes and suffixes. Students learn to define new compounds and phrases by analysis of their parts.

Cross-listed: Kinesiology KIN-2850/3


CLAS-2920/3 Food, Diet and Dining in Antiquity

This course explores the techniques, issues, and controversies involved in reconstructing the role of food, diet and dining in Greek and Roman antiquity. Topics addressed include examination of lines of evidence (broadly encompassing ancient literary and textual evidence, depictions from art, and material remains from archaeological excavation); the economic basis for production, trade, transport and consumption of foodstuffs in antiquity; practicalities and limitations involved in cooking, preserving and preparing food stuffs; the social and philosophical context of eating and dining; the role of food in ancient religious and cult practices; medical approaches to food, diet and health in antiquity.

Cross-listed: Anthropology ANTH-2229/3


CLAS-2950/3 The Roman Army

This course considers the Roman army, from its origins and increasing professionalization during the Monarchy and Republic, to its role as emperor-maker during the third century CE. Topics may include the evidence for the army, recruitment, organization, strategy, unit tactics, troop disposition on the frontiers, and veterans. More broadly, this course examines the army's wider impact on culture and society with regard to religion, Romanization, and political life.

Cross-listed: History HIST-2099/3


CLAS-3006/3 Topics in Ancient History

This course explores fundamental issues, specific social institutions, key historical figures, vital events, important periods, and current directions in the study of ancient Greek and Roman history in greater detail than the history survey classes allow. The focus of study varies from year to year. Examples include Greek and Roman slavery, Perikles and the Athenian Empire, the myth of Alexander the Great, and comparative Greek and Roman historiography and biography. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary source material (in translation). Information concerning these course offerings is provided by the Department.

Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies.

Cross-listed: HIST-3006/3


CLAS-3060/3 Health in Antiquity

This course explores health, disease, and medicine in the Greek and Roman world. It draws upon evidence from the ancient textual sources (especially Galen and Hippocrates), social history, and archaeology (the latter including all manner of finds - architecture, art, artifacts, environmental materials, and skeletal remains) to examine how residents of the Greek and Roman world perceived and experienced health and disease, and how they sought to combat illness and to promote healing.

Cross-listed: Anthropology ANTH-3262/3 and Kinesiology and Applied Health KIN-3060/3


CLAS-3090/3 Classical and Medieval Science

This lecture/seminar course examines the theories, experiments, and calculations of Greek, Roman, and European scientists before the Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century. As well as considering the work of the major contributors to astronomy, physics, and mathematics in this period, the course places their ideas and the work of the schools of Greece, Rome, and medieval Europe within their social, cultural, and intellectual contexts.

Cross-listed: History HIST-3903/3


CLAS-3310/3 Alexander the Great

This course looks at the life and conquests of Alexander the Great. It begins with a chronological examination of the rise of Macedon under Alexander’s father, Philip II, Alexander’s early life, his conquest of the Persian Empire, and ultimately, his death. Four major themes are then explored: Alexander’s military and its evolution, his relationship to mainland Greece, Alexander’s empire, and his divinity.

Cross-listed: History HIST-3140/3


CLAS-3320/3 Death in Antiquity

This course approaches various aspects relating to death in antiquity (emphasizing Roman antiquity) from the perspective of two disciplines, Anthropology and Classics. Topics include beliefs and philosophies about the afterlife; causes of death, with emphasis on diseases and demographics; the practicalities of planning for death and disposing of the dead; the methods and significance of commemoration; rituals of grief and mourning; spatial distribution of cemeteries in antiquity; methods and theories in mortuary archaeology from classical sites; and analysis of osteological, artifactual, and architectural data from such sites. Contemplation of cross-cultural comparisons on these and other topics under study is encouraged.

Cross-listed: Anthropology ANTH-3261/3


CLAS-3754/3 Ancient Epic in Translation

By reading works of ancient epic in translation by important ancient authors (e.g. Homer, Apollonius, Vergil, Ovid, Lucan, Statius), students are introduced to the literary characteristics of the genre and their strategic deployment. The literary and historical contexts of specific epics are discussed in order to make their cultural significance clear.

Cross-listed: English ENGL-3754/3


CLAS-3755/3 Ancient Drama in Translation

Students read the works of ancient tragic poets (e.g. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca) and of ancient comic poets (e.g. Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus, Terence) in translation. Literary conventions of both ancient tragedy and comedy are addressed. The plays are situated within their broader historical and festival contexts to make clear their cultural significance.

Cross-listed: English ENGL-3755/3


CLAS-3756/3 Topics in Ancient Literature

This course deals with the interpretation and appreciation of literary genres, authors, or works from the canon of Greek and Latin literature. The focus of study varies from year to year. Examples include love poetry, satire, the ancient novel, and letter-writing as a literary form. Information concerning these course offerings is provided by the Department.

Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies.

Cross-listed: ENGL-3756/3


CLAS-3830/3 Kingdoms and City-States in the Greek and Roman Worlds

This course focuses on a particular kingdom or city-state of the ancient world. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The instructor and the focus of study vary from year to year. Information concerning these course offerings is provided by the Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level.

Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies.

Cross-listed: History HIST-3011/3 and Classics CLAS-4830/3


CLAS-3840/3 Provinces and Subjects

This course focuses on a particular Roman province or subject population of the Roman Empire. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The instructor and the focus of study vary from year to year. Information concerning these course offerings is provided by the Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level.

Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies.

Cross-listed: History HIST-3010/3 and Classics CLAS-4840/3


CLAS-3850/3 Eras

This course focuses on a specific era, or time period, in ancient and/or classical history. The topic draws upon evidence from the ancient textual evidence, archaeology, and cultural and social history in the light of modern theory and scholarship. The instructor and the focus of study vary from year to year. Information concerning these course offerings is provided by the Department. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level.

Note: This course may be repeated when the topic varies.

Cross-listed: History HIST-3009/3 and Classics CLAS-4850/3


In addition, many of our 3000 and 4000 level CLAS courses are cross-listed within the Department to ensure that we are able to offer a variety of courses needed for Honours students in both the Classical languages and Classical Civilizations streams.