Courses By Department - Arts

Classics

CLAS-2082 (3) Sites of the Ancient Greek and Roman World II           
This course follows up on Sites of the Ancient Greek and Roman World I, and consists of first-hand examination of museum collections and sites of the ancient world, normally in Greece and Italy. The destination and content of the course varies from year to year. As part of the requirements of the course, each student is expected to make a site presentation on location. Sites are chosen prior to leaving Winnipeg in consultation with the instructor.
PREREQUISITES: Completion of CLAS-2081 and departmental permission.

CLAS-2910 (3) Introductory Classical Archaeology: Principles and Practices                              
This course provides an introduction to the development, principles, and practices associated with archaeological analysis and study of Classical civilizations (primarily Greece and Rome). A wide range of material categories (such as buildings, coins, pottery, sculpture, geological deposits, and plant and animal remains) are considered along with the techniques devised by Classical archaeologists for understanding them and their significance as evidence for Classical societies. Dating and chronology, geography, function, typology and the interface between material remains and written evidence are considered. Curriculum includes special attention to case studies and to hands-on experience where possible.

CLAS-3500 (6) Experiential Learning in Classics and Classical Archaeology  
This course provides practical experience through experiential learning for students in environments outside the classroom. This takes the form of practical experience in museums, laboratories, archaeological and historical sites, and active participation in excavations. The intensive instructions employs lectures, seminars, fieldwork, and on occasion laboratory components, in order to teach analytical, interpretive, and practical techniques in Classics and Classical Archaeology. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000 level.
PREREQUISITES: Interested students should consult the Department Chair or designate.

CLAS-4500 (6) Experiential Learning in Classics and Classical Archaeology  
This course provides practical experience through experiential learning for students in environments outside the classroom at a more intensive and more advanced level than CLAS-3500. This takes the form of practical experience in museums, laboratories, archaeological and historical sites, and active participation in excavations. The intensive instruction employs lectures, seminars, fieldwork, and on occasion laboratory components, in order to teach analytical, interpretive, and practical techniques in Classics and Classical Archaeology.
PREREQUISITES: This course is open only to students in the Honours BA in Classics (Classical Civilization) and the Honours BA in Classics (Classical Languages).

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Conflict Resolution Studies

CRS-2242(3) METHODS OF CONFLICT RESOLUTION IN EDUCATIONAL SETTINGS
This course will provide practical applications of conflict resolution skills, for teaching conflict resolution and for the implementation of conflict management programs from elementary to secondary levels. Practical skills for conflict resolution in the classroom, in the home, in the peer group, and in staff relations will be developed. Areas of skill learning will include conflict mediation, listening skills, responding to anger and violence, and classroom management. A practicum component will be included to provide the opportunity to link.theory to practice.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-2232(3) or EDUC-1001(3) or EDUC-1801(3) AND CRS-1200(6).
CROSS-LISTED: Education EDUC-2242(3)

CRS-3294(3) PRACTICUM IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES
This program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments. Note; Students must complete both this course and CRS-3295(3) to fulfill their 6 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-1200(6), CRS-2210(3), and CRS-3220(3), permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director, AND a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course .and CRS-3298(6). This is a limited enrolment course and is generally only available.to students in overseas placements, or in designated local practicum placements.

CRS-3295(3) PRACTICUM IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES
This program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments. Note: Students must complete both this course and CRS- 3294(3) to fulfill their 6 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-1200(6), CRS-2210(3), and CRS-3220(3), permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director, AND a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and CRS-3298(6). This is a limited enrolment course and is generally only available to students in overseas placements, or designated local practicum placements.

CRS-3296(1.5) PRACTICUM IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES
This program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a relevant agency, exposing students" to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its re.solution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments. Note: Students must complete both this course and CRS-3297(1.5) to fulfill their 3 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-1200(6), CRS-2210(3), and CRS-3220(3), permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director, AND a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and CRS-3299(3). This is a limited enrolment course.

CRS-3297(1.5) PRACTICUM IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES
This program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its resolution. Students
integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments. Note:
Students must complete both this course and CRS-3296(1.5) to fulfill their 3 credit hour Practicum
requirement.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-1200(6). CRS-2210(3), and CRS- 3220(3), permission ofMenno Simons
College Practicum Director, AND a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and CRS-3299(3). This is a limited
enrolment course.

CRS-3298(6) PRACTICUM IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES
This program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised
'field' experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a relevant agency, exposing students
to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-1200(6), CRS-2210(3), and CRS-3220(3), permission ofMenno Simons College Practicum Director, AND a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and CRS-3294(3) and CRS-3295(3). This is a limited enrolment course and is generally only available to students in overseas placements, or in designated local practicum placements.

CRS-3299(3) PRACTICUM IN CONFLICT RESOLUTION STUDIES
This program is designed for students to integrate their academic learning in settings of supervised 'field' experiences. The practicum involves voluntary work with a relevant agency, exposing students to actual work settings where they can apply their insights about conflict and its resolution. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation, and academic assignments.
PREREQUISITES: CRS-1200(6), CRS-2210(3), and, CRS-3220(3), permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director, AND a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and CRS-3296(1.5) and CRS-3297(1.5). This is a limited enrolment course.

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Criminal Justice

CJ-3800(15) BLOCK FIELD PRACTICUM IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE
This course engages students in service-based learning. Students are placed in a service organization and work on a full-time basis for one term as volunteers. The program provides students with an opportunity to apply lessons learned in the criminal justice program, gain related field experience, and provide service to their community. Assignments on topics related to their placement provide a link to their scholarly studies.
PREREQUISITES: CJ 3205(3)

CJ-4800(6) RESEARCH FIELD PRACTICUM
This applied course will give students the opportunity for service based learning. Students will spend eight hours per week at a previously arranged field site and engage in service.
PREREQUISITES: CJ 2101(3)

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Dance Program

DANC-3911(6) Dance Paedagogy
This course explores methods of teaching in creative dance, ballet and modern at the elementary level and offers studio experience in teaching and/or assistant teaching. It is normally taken during the second or third year.
PREREQUISITES: Permission of the Program Co-Director

DANC-4902 (6) Performance III
This course represents a progression from the 3000-level performance courses with emphasis on the student's individual development. It involves a practicum with a professional choreographer.
PREREQUISITES: Honours Form Required, DANC-3901, DANC-3902, and DANC-3903 or permission of the Program Co-Director DANC-4901 and DANC-4903 (must be taken concurrently).

DANC-4903 (6) Performance IV
This course represents a further progression from the 3000-level courses with emphasis on the student's individual development. It involves a practicum with a professional choreographer.
PREREQUISITES: Honours Form Required, DANC-3901, DANC-3902, and DANC-3903 or permission of the Program Co-Director, DANC-4901 and DANC-4902 (must be taken concurrently).

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Developmental Studies

DEV-2004 (3) Observation and Evaluation Techniques in Child-Care Settings
This course provides a theoretical and practical examination of the principles of systematic observation and evaluation in child-care settings. The focus is on studying and implementing different observational strategies ranging from anecdotal reports to event sampling methods. Practical activities and projects will provide opportunities to acquire new techniques for observing, recording, and analyzing children's behaviours, and to make valid inferences. Based on observations in selected child care settings, students will complete assignments designed to help them build skills as reflective practitioners, program evaluators, facilitators of children's learning, and providers of a healthy and safe environment.
PREREQUISITES: PSYC-2200 or permission of the Director of Developmental Studies.

DEV-3610 (3) Topics in Leadership in Early Childhood Care and Education
The course provides an opportunity for currently enrolled interning students to understand and to integrate core concepts such as mentoring, team building, strategic planning, advocacy, communication, and inclusion of children with diverse needs, as they explore management and leadership issues in childcare systems. Students acquire information and skills through in-class discussions and presentations, reporting on experiences gained through their concurrent internship placement, and individual research and reading.
PREREQUISITES: Students are expected to take this course in the final term of their Developmental Studies program. DEV-3630 (must be taken previously or at the same time as this course).
RESTRICTIONS: Written permission of the Director of Developmental Studies is required to take this course. Students may not hold credit for this course and DEV-3310 | DEV-3410.

DEV-3630 (3) Advanced Internship
The course provides advanced field experience in the administration of childcare centres and leadership in the early childhood community. Students learn skills within such topics as childcare licensing requirements, programs and policy planning, personnel management, budgeting, the inclusion of children with special needs, and developing and implementing individualized programs. Students develop a major project in their selected area of specialization that provides a focused learning experience in their placement.
PREREQUISITES: Departmental permission.
COREQUISITES: DEV-3610(3)
RESTRICTIONS: Written permission of the Director of Developmental Studies is required to take this course. Students are expected to take this course in the final term of their Developmental Studies program. Students may not hold credit for this course and DEV-3330 | DEV-3430

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Disability Studies

DIS-3002 (3) Disability Studies Research Placement  
This field placement is designed to provide Disability Studies students with the opportunity to apply their research skills to a position in a disability organization. Students learn new research methodologies, work in teams and on their own, and make contacts outside academe. Placements are negotiated between students, instructors, and hosting agencies. Students are matched with agencies based on their research skills, interests, academic background, and the needs of the host. A good knowledge of research methods is required.
COREQUISITES: SOC-2125 or SOC-2126 or PSYC-2102 or any introductory social science qualitative or quantitative research methods course.

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East Asian Languages & Culture

EALC-2320 (6) Korean Civilization: Traditional and Modern  
This course provides introductory knowledge of traditional and contemporary culture through an examination of traditional values, arts, religions, as well as contemporary Korean popular culture. The course is taught at Chonnam National University in Gwangju, South Korea through lectures, multimedia presentations, and field trips. It also fulfills the Study Abroad requirement for the four-year majors in the EALC Program.
RESTRICTIONS: Written permission of the Instructor is required to take this course. 

EALC-2720 (6) Japanese Civilization       
This course familiarizes students with major components of Japanese civilization such as religion, the arts, and politics with a specific focus on their importance in shaping Japanese history and culture. It is taught in Japan as an intensive summer course. Students reside and attend classes on the campus of Doshisha University in the city of Kyoto. The course features field trips and guest lectures.

EALC-2770 (6) Introduction to Chinese Culture: Past and Present           
This course familiarizes students with major Chinese cultural traditions such a Confucianism, Daoism (Taoism), and Buddhism, examining specifically their roles in shaping Chinese culture in areas such as religion and philosophy, language and literature, art and architecture, economics and business. This course may be taught on campus, or as an intensive Summer course taught in China. When taught in China, students will reside and attend classes on the campus of Shanghai Normal University. It will feature field trips and guest lectures by Shanghai Normal University faculty.

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English

ENGL-3102(1) Creative Writing Field Research
This course provides students with the opportunity to work in groups with a professional writer in an off-campus setting, for a short period of time. Each section takes a unique approach to a different aspect of creative writing in fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction. Students participate in a writing project designed by the instructor. Interested students should submit a portfolio (five pages of their own writing) to the English Department well before registration. Please note thatthis course is one credit hour only. This course may be repeated for credit when the topic varies.
NOTE: This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis.
PREREQUISITE: 12 credit hours in English and permission of Department.

ENGL-3120(6) Practicum in Literature, Literacy and Language  
Students arrange volunteer work placements with organizations that support literature, literacy, and language development in Manitoba. First, students identify areas of interest, explore the theory and implications of the proposed work, and design the terms of their commitment and accountability within their chosen settings. Then they work at the placement and participate in the seminar so that they may reflect upon and represent their practicum work.
PREREQUISITE: 6 credit hours in English at the 2000 level or above.             

ENGL-4103(3) Research Apprenticeship 
In this apprenticeship, students reflect on how research issues influence their study of language and literature. Students meet with instructors who have similar research interests in one-to-one tutorials and seminars to discuss common research questions and practices. They may consider a range of issues including for example, the analysis of how key periodicals, critical studies, and professional associations define a particular research topic. This course supports the development of research skills for work in the field of English studies. Students may also be guided in the preparation of manuscripts for publication.
PREREQUISITE: Honours Form Required, 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3)
RESTRICTIONS: ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) must be taken previously or at the same time as this course.     

ENGL-4104(3) Tutorial Apprenticeship in English  
This course provides opportunities for experiencing and exploring learning and teaching strategies in university language and literature courses. Students assist in a designated lecture/seminar course in English in a variety of ways. They may be asked to lead tutorial groups, to facilitate seminars, to help in the preparation of course materials, to offer support to students, and to edit and evaluate student's written work. Students meet regularly with the supervising professor in order to discuss and evaluate teaching strategies and materials.
PREREQUISITE: Honours Form Required, 6 credit hours of First-year English, including ENGL-1001(6) or ENGL-1000(3)
RESTRICTIONS: ENGL-2003(6) or ENGL-2142(6) or ENGL-2145(6) or ENGL-2146(6) must be taken previously or at the same time as this course.

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History

HIST-1010(6) ART AND HISTORY This course will consider the relationship between art and its historical contexts, discussing both the art works' conditions of production and their subsequent interpretations. Visual art (which may include traditional forms such as painting and sculpture, and other media such as photography, dance, film and television) will be investigated as historical evidence, human expression and political discourse. Questions of gender and race will be addressed. Field trips to local exhibitions and architectural sites will be arranged during class time.

HIST-2332(3) The Holocaust in Europe Field Course This 3-credit field course in Europe builds on themes and content surveyed in HIST-2328, Antisemitism and the Holocaust. It investigates Jewish cultural and religious life in Europe before the Second World War, the nature and institutions of Nazi Germany, the ghetto and camp system created as a part of the Final Solution, the economics of slave labour as part of the German war economy, post-war memorialization of the destruction of European Jewry, and contemporary European antisemitism. Locations for the field course vary for specific course offerings, but include sites in Poland and other countries throughout Central Europe.
PREREQUISITES: HIST-2328 or permission of the instructor
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and REL-2632

HIST-3007(3) Topics in History of Food  This course investigates the historical significance of food production and consumption. The variety of approaches and the wide range of content in this comparatively new field are discussed, including: gender, ethnicity, (trans)nationalism, and identity; business, labour, and capitalism; production and consumption; the role of government; the environment; the body; taste; and memory. Note: Students must have completed or must register for and complete the three University of Winnipeg Oral History Centre Workshops.

HIST-3504(3) The Manitoba Food History Truck This course provides an introduction to food history, oral history, and public history. Students conduct oral history interviews on the Manitoba Food History Truck, process them for archival deposit, and produce a public history project in Manitoba food history for possible publication. The first week of this course is taught in classrooms at UW (5 classes of 3 hours each). Students are divided into small groups for the second week, with instruction time of approximately 6 hours per day, to participate in field research trips, conduct archival research, and do research on the Manitoba Food History Truck.

HIST-3573 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Indigenous History, Field Course In this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways in which Indigenous and European technologies of the fur trade era complemented each other. The first half of the course is taught through seminar discussions and lectures at the University of Winnipeg/WEC, the second half of the course takes place at the ANPO-Bison Ranch, near Rossburn, Manitoba, where students have an opportunity to work with Indigenous Elders from the nearby First Nations communities, learn about and experience traditional technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional tipis and/or modern tents.
PREREQUISITES: ANTH-3273(3), ANTH-4273(3)
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3273 | ANTH-4273 | HIST-4573. Students should notify the instructor in case of dietary restrictions, plant-, animal-, or food allergies. At the 4000-level, a greater amount of written work and more in-depth primary research are required. CROSS-LISTED:HIST-4573

HIST-3814 (3/6) Indigenous Arts This lecture/seminar course offers an introduction to the arts of indigenous peoples with a focus on contemporary First Nations and Métis art in Canada. Students explore critical approaches to the social and political issues surrounding tradition, appropriation, modernity, and personal identity in our survey of visual art. Forms examined may include painting, sculpture, print making, installation, dance, music, theatre, new media, and performance. Local artists, exhibitions, and collections offer students first-hand experience of current art production in Manitoba.

HIST-3825(6) THEORIES AND METHODS FOR ART HISTORY  This lecture/seminar course explores various traditional art historical and critical approaches to the study of art including visual analysis, biography, iconography, and more recent theories such as historiography, feminism, and postmodernism. Museums, galleries, and the art market as well as techniques and conservation are also considered. Research methods for art historians are put into practice in written assignments and, whenever possible, field trips to local sites and exhibitions take place during class time.

HIST-4573 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Indigenous History, Field Course In this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways in which Indigenous and European technologies of the fur trade era complemented each other. The first half of the course is taught through seminar discussions and lectures at the University of Winnipeg/WEC, the second half of the course takes place at the ANPO-Bison Ranch, near Rossburn, Manitoba, where students have an opportunity to work with Indigenous Elders from the nearby First Nations communities, learn about and experience traditional technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional tipis and/or modern tents.
PREREQUISITES: ANTH-3273(3), ANTH-4273(3)
RESTRICTIONS: Honours Form Required.  CROSS-LISTED:HIST-3573

HIST-4804(3) Art History Field School Art historians and curators study transnational art and architecture, and field courses are an opportunity for students to experience art and architecture in person, to merge theory with practice. The site visits vary depending on the destination, but each trip offers and experiential learning environment which contextualizes historic and contemporary information through a critical lens. Field work could include studying art, architecture, curatorial installations, and participating in internships or practicum. Faculty guide students through a series of preparatory meetings, site visits, tours of museums, exhibitions, meeting artists and cultural workers. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Experimental Course - This course is offered on a trial basis to gauge interest in the topic. Students who successfully complete this course receive credit as indicated.
RESTRICTIONS: Honours Form Required. 

HIST-4831(6) PRACTICUM IN CURATORIAL STUDIES This course combines the theory and practice of curatorial work, public history and experiential learning for students interested in achieving a university credit by working with a local museum or art gallery. The Practicum provides opportunities to explore a range of placements with host institutions in order to learn about being a curator. Students are expected to work 6-8 hours a week in the host institution. Program partners wilt provide training for the interns who have chosen to work with them. Partnerships opportunities include, but are not limited to Winnipeg Art Gallery, Plug In Contemporary Art Institute, Buhler Gallery, and other local galleries and museums.
RESTRICTIONS: Honours Form Required.

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Human Rights and Global Studies

HRGS-3510(3 or 6) Practicum in HRGS In the Practicum, students integrate theory and classroom knowledge with practice through supervised field work and structured assignments and reflections. The practicum involves volunteer work related to Human Rights and Global Studies in a relevant organization, and participation in specified seminars and/or written analyses. Enrolment is subject to approval of a practicum proposal submitted by a student with a declared major in HRGS. Interested students are advised to consult the HRGS Coordinator well in advance of the term in which they wish to enrol.
PREREQUISITES: HRGS-2101(6) (or the previous POL-2101, MULT-3002(6) Activist Internship in Human Rights and Social Justice. This course - for 3rd and 4th year students having completed 30 hours of credit at the university level -offers access to a variety of human rights and social justice initiatives in Manitoba, over a 12 month period, which may include: conferences, workshops, seminars, summer institutes and various projects undertaken by community organizations, Global College and its Institutes, programs and initiatives through Menno Simons College and centres like The Global Welcome Centre that has initiated partnerships with the university and refugee communities.

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Indigenous Studies

IS-1010(3) Indigenous Ways of Knowing Large numbers of Indigenous peoples settling in Winnipeg, and in core neighbourhoods, suggest that students studying urbanism need to be aware that the city and critical issues in the inner-city can be interpreted differently. This course offers an introduction to Indigenous ways of knowing through active participation in strategies that facilitate the production of Aboriginal knowledge and through comparisons with Euro-American ways of knowing. By taking part in basic ceremony and related practices, students gain an understanding of how First Peoples of Manitoba relate to each other, to the land, to other animals, and to the world.

IS-2401(3) Indigenous Food Systems  This course offers land-based learning opportunities to explore the importance of, challenges to, and opportunities for Indigenous food systems in Manitoba and Canada, along with classroom discussion on nutritional and health information. Interdisciplinary themes include traditional food as medicine; Indigenous food systems of production, consumption, distribution; Indigenous knowledges and perspectives on challenges and significance of traditional food systems. The typical course design includes 1 to 1.5 weeks in classrooms and 36 hours of experiential learning from Indigenous elders and Indigenous food researchers in Manitoba First Nations communities.

IS-3201(3) Indigenous Ethnobotany Field School  This field course on Indigenous Botany offers land-based learning opportunities to explore the multiple uses (including medicinal, ceremonial, aesthetic, and spiritual) of local plants by Indigenous communities along with the classroom instruction of botanical information. The major interdisciplinary sub-themes covered through this course include traditional medicinal plant knowledge, applied Ethnobotany, Indigenous conservation and bio cultural landscape. The course design includes 1 to 1.5 weeks in classrooms and 36 hours of experiential learning from herbalists and Indigenous elders in the Manitoba First Nations.

IS-4000 (3 or 6) Indigenous Studies Practicum
This course offers experience in Indigenous Studies under the guidance and supervision of faculty and on-site personnel. The course is arranged between the student, the instructor, and a site willing to provide relevant experience in a setting related to a topic in Indigenous Studies. The hours spent on-site will be determined according to the number of credits. Examples of possible practicum sites: Indigenous community organizations; Indigenous governmental or other institutions; museums or art galleries working on Indigenous exhibits or productions; non-Indigenous governmental or NGO entity dealing with Indigenous peoples or issues; or an Indigenous business or media outlet.
PREREQUISITES: IS-1016 and IS-1017 (or the former IS-1015) AND permission of instructor.

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International Development Studies

IDS-3194(3) PRACTICUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES The practicum allows students to ground their academic learning with experiential learning within the auspices of an overseas relief and development agency. The practicum generally involves voluntary work with an agency, exposing the participant to new cultural, social, and/or economic situations. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation and academic assignments.
NOTE: Students must complete both this course and IDS-3195(3) to fulfill their 6 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100(6), IDS-2110(3) (or the former IDS-3110(3)), IDS-3111(3). Permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director AND minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and IDS-3198(6). This is a limited enrolment course and is generally only available to students in overseas placements.

IDS-3195(3) PRACTICUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
The practicum allows students to ground their academic learning with experiential learning within the auspices of an overseas relief and development agency. The practicum generally involves voluntary work with an agency, exposing the participant to new cultural, social, and/or economic situations. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation and academic assignments.
NOTE: Students must complete both this course and IDS-3194(3) to fulfill their 6 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100(6), IDS-2110(3) (or the former IDS-3110(3)), IDS-3111(3). Permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director AND minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and IDS-3198(6). This is a limited enrolment course and is generally only available to students in overseas placements.

IDS-3196(1.5) PRACTICUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
The practicum allows students to ground their academic learning with experiential learning within the auspices of a local or overseas relief and development agency. The practicum generally involves voluntary work with an agency, exposing the participant to new cultural, social, and/or economic situations. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation and academic assignments.
NOTE: Students must complete both this course and IDS-3197(1.5) to fulfill their 3 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100(6), IDS-2110(3) (or the former IDS-3110(3)), IDS-31H(3). Permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director AND minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and IDS-3199(3). This is a limited enrolment course.

IDS-3197(1.5) PRACTICUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
The practicum allows students to ground their academic learning with experiential learning within the auspices of a local or overseas relief and development agency. The practicum generally involves voluntary work with an agency, exposing the participant to new cultural, social, and/or economic situations. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation and academic assignments.
NOTE: Students must complete both this course and IDS- 3196(1.5) to fulfill their 3 credit hour Practicum requirement.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100(6). IDS-2110(3) (or the former IDS-3110(3)), IDS-3111(3). Permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director AND minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.15
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and IDS-3199(3). This is a limited enrolment course.

IDS-3198(6) PRACTICUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
The practicum allows students to ground their academic learning with experiential learning within the auspices of an overseas relief and development agency. The practicum generally involves voluntary work with an agency, exposing the participant to new cultural, social and/or economic situations. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation and academic assignments.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100(6), IDS-2110(3) (or the former IDS-3110(3)), IDS-3111(3). Permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director AND minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and IDS-3194(3) and IDS- 3195(3).This is a limited enrolment course and is generally only available to students in overseas placements.

IDS-3199(3) PRACTICUM IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
The practicum allows students to ground their academic learning with experiential learning within the auspices of a local or overseas relief and development agency. The practicum generally involves voluntary work with an agency, exposing the participant to new cultural, social and/or economic situations. Students integrate theory with practice through seminar participation and academic assignments.
PREREQUISITES: IDS-1100(6), IDS-2110(3) (or the former IDS-3110(3)), IDS-3111(3). Permission of Menno Simons College Practicum Director AND minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.75.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit in both this course and IDS-3196(1.5) and IDS- 3197(1.5).This is a limited enrolment course.

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Modern Languages and Literatures

ITAL-2201(3) ITALIAN FOOD AND CULTURE 
This course examines the ways in which Italian food is constantly being reinvented. We use texts and video to explore socioeconomic trends that have influenced food production and consumption in Italy, such as the initiative of the slow food movement in the 1980s when fast food threatened the nature of Italian cuisine. We look at changes in family dynamics and the role of women over the years. Language and literature play an important role in the evolution and reinvention of Italian food culture. In an era of multiculturalism and globalization, we question the term authentic practice when describing foods and beverages.

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Psychology

PSYC 3790(3): APPLIED PSYCHOLOGY
This course provides the necessary background for students working in applied settings in psychology. The course focuses on professional and ethical issues. Students registering for this course will be assisted in finding research opportunities in community-based organizations or serving as mentor in a supervised setting.

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Political Science

POL-4515(6) INNER CITY SEMINAR
This course seeks to explain the emergence and the character of inner cities, and to evaluate proposed solutions to inner city problems. Some attention is paid to the literature on American inner cities; we focus intensively on Winnipeg's inner city. The course features a 3-hour-per-week practicum requirement with an inner city community-based organization, and the conducting of original, primary research on an inner city topic.
PREREQUISITES: One 3-credijt-hour course in Area 5. Community Politics, or permission of
instructor.

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Religion and Culture

REL-3601(3)/REL-4601(3) STORIED LIVES: CONTEMPORARY SPIRITUAL BIOGRAPHIES AND THE CONSTRUCTION OF IDENTITY
This course presents the current social scientific reflection on the "life history" as a means of understanding indrviduals and contextualizing the larger notions of "religious traditions" and "culture". Specifically, it considers the ways people construct and maintain their religious identities by weaving their own experiences into a narrative which includes other individuals and institutions. In addition to considering this method theoretically, students have an opportunity to employ this tool in the context of fieldwork.
PREREQUISITES: Students registering at the 4000 level must have Departmental permission. 6 credit hours in Religion & Culture or Permission of the instructor.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not receive credit for both REL- 3601(3) and REL-4601(3)

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Rhetoric, Writing, and Communication

RHET-3331(6) WRITING PARTNERSHIPS PRACTICUM
This course stresses the concepts of experiential education and of writing as social action. As such, key component of this course is taking part in a writing partnership with a community organization outside the university, and in some cases, university partners that need students' writing expertise. The goals of the course are to help students learn how to write for audiences inside and outside of the academy, to learn ethical guidelines for writing with community and university partners, to learn practical skills relating to the production of a range of texts, and to understand the intersections between writing and social justice initiatives.
PREREQUISITES: Any section of Academic Writing or exemption from the writing requirement and completion of 24 credit hours. Students taking a Major in Rhetoric and Communications must complete Academic Writing before taking this course

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Sociology

SOC-4800(6) FIELD RESEARCH PLACEMENT
This course provides students with two sociological field research placement options. They can either be matched with an opportunity to work in a supervised research setting in a community or they can take an existing research proposal and work with a matched community organization to bring the proposal to completion. The course has both classroom and field research components.
PREREQUISITES: SOC-2125(3) and SOC-2126(3).
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS: Permission of Instructor

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Theatre and Film

THFM-2001(3) THEATRE/FILM PRACTICUM I
In this course, students participate in a teaching production in the area of specialization they select. PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Department Chair

THFM-2002(3)THEATRE/FILM PRACTICUM II
In this course, students participate in a production either on a more advanced level in the area of specialization chosen in THFM-2001(3) or in another area of specialization.
PREREQUISITES: THFM-2001(3) and permission of the Department Chair

THFM-2605(2) LIGHTING FOR DANCE PRACTICUM 
In this course, material taught in Introduction to Stage Lighting for Dance [THFM-2604(2)] is applied to exercises culminating in a public presentation. Students go through the entire process of creating and executing lighting designs for an actual performance of a new work. This involves conferences with the choreographer(s), a series of proposals, and final design and execution. Additional conferences are arranged as needed. This course is offered on a pass/fail basis.
PREREQUISITE: THFM-2604(2).
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not receive credit for both this course and THFM-2602(3). This course is restricted to students who have been accepted into the University ofWinnipeg/School of Contemporary Dancers Dance Program Stream.

THFM-3808(3) STAGECRAFT PRACTICUM
This course is a practicum in stagecraft which encompasses the management and construction of all scenery for one of the departmental public exercises. The students in this course are involved in planning, ordering materials, shop setup, construction, installation, and removal of a complete set. The course consists of both lectures and labs, which occur concurrently in each class, as necessary.
PREREQUISITES: THFM-2801(6) AND permission of the instructor.

THEM-4809(6) ADVANCED STAGECRAFT PRACTICUM I
This course is a continuation of the stagecraft portion ofTHFM-2801 Production I with greater emphasis on the skills, techniques, and principles required to construct stage scenery. The course is also an advanced practicum which encompasses the management and construction of all scenery for the department"? 4th-year public exercise (Fall). In addition, course content focuses on the development of blueprint reading and other practical skills as they relate to scenic construction. Emphasis is also placed on the role of the master carpenter's relationship with the set designer.
PREREQUISITES: THFM-3801(6) AND permission of the instructor.
RESTRICTION: Students who have taken the former THFM-2001(3) Practicum version of Stagecraft II OR THFM-3809(3) Stagecraft II may not take this course.

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Urban and Inner City Studies

UIC-3001(6) URBAN AND INNER CITY PRACTICUM 
This course provides an experiential learning opportunity for students with an inner-city organization. Students spend three hours per week with the organization, observing what takes place, meeting and working with inner-city people and organizations, and taking on work assignments under the direction of the organization's staff and with the support; of the course instructor. Course assignments may include, among others, interpretive journals and/or projects prepared for the organization.
PREREQUISITES: UIC-1001(3) and one other Core Course in Urban and Inner-City Studies

UIC-3220 (6) COMMUNITY ADVOCACY INTERNSHIP
This experiential learning course provides students an opportunity to put advocacy theories into practice through an internship with a community-based organization. Prior to the beginning of the course, the instructor works with students to identify a placement aligned with their specific advocacy interests and acts as a liaison between the placement supervisor and students. In addition to attending an internship one day (6 hrs.) per week, students participate in a monthly seminar led by the instructor. Students write reflection papers on their workplace experiences in relation to advocacy theories and prepare a final paper and class presentation. Restriction: Students may not hold credit for this course and UIC-3001(6).
PREREQUISITES: UIC-2210 [prerequisite(s)]. 

UIC-3230 (6) INNER-CITY WORK STUDY
Inner-City Work Study is a summer intensive course that brings students from diverse backgrounds together to work and learn in the inner city. In the spirit of reconciliation and building bridges toward a city free from racism and exclusion, students explore theories of community practice toward transformative change, guided by anti-oppressive and social justice frameworks. Students put theory into practice through a paid 4-month summer internship with a community-based non-profit organization. The intensive work/study program provides students the unique opportunity to combine scholarly learning with summer employment where they will gain valuable experience while contribute to the inner-city community.
PREREQUISITES: Students will have completed a minimum of 3 credit hours in an Urban and Inner-City Studies course [prerequisite(s)]
RESTRICTIONS: Department Permission Required.

UIC-4020(3) INNER-CITY WORKSHOP 
This course combines theory and practice in the study of the dynamics of low-income inner-city communities. The course includes an examination of some recent literature on the phenomenon of low-income inner cities. It also features a practicum placement— three hours per week—with an inner-city community-based organization, and a term paper based on primary research on an innercity topic, preferably related to the practicum assignment. Students develop research skills in a hands-on fashion, while being exposed to the practical realities of day-to-day life in the inner city.
PREREQUISITES: Student must have taken two other UIC courses

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Women's and Gender Studies

WGS-4000(9) WOMEN'S AND GENDER STUDIES PRACTICUM 
Students engage in a feminist practicum project with a Manitoba organization involved in feminist work. The first term (3 credit hours) is spent linking issues of feminist theory and practice, and developing a meaningful work project with the organization. In the second term (6 credit hours), students complete the work project, meet periodically with the class to report on progress, and share strategies and knowledge. Students present their final report at the W&GS Colloquium. The nature of the project is decided by the student, in consultation with their instructor and practicum supervisor. Students arrange their own placement with an organization, subject to instructor approval.
PREREQUISITES: WGS-3200(6) or the former WGS-2232(6) and permission of the instructor

WGS-4401 (3) SPECIAL TOPICS COURSE
2020-21 offering: Writing a Feminist Guide to University 
Guidebooks on university include American texts like the Ms Mentor books and Canadian works addressing faculty like The Slow Professor. The somewhat Canadian-inclusive Transforming Scholarship problematically presumes WGS students are White, young, and privileged. We prepare an alternative guidebook. Student participants will learn about Canadian academic book production, from the initial conception to the preparation of a manuscript which we plan to submit to a Canadian publisher.

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