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Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance


Headshots from Zoom Presentation

L-R: Dr. Jaime Cidro, Dylan Jones, Maynan Robinson, Dr. Jeannie Kerr, Dr. Lorena Fontaine, Dr. Andre Hatala, following Maynan’s defense of her thesis, “Decolonizing Health Systems to Enable Participation: A Manitoba Renal Program Case Study” in Spring 2020.

Headshots from Zoom Presentation

L-R: Jennifer Meixner, Dylan Jones, Kevin Walby, Dr. Glenn Moulaison, Dr. Shailesh Shukla, Dr. Lorena Fontaine, Elder Dr. Myra Laramee , following Jennifer Meixner defense of her thesis, “De-Colonizing Contemporary Criminal Justice: Indigenous Innovations in Manitoba” in Spring 2020..

L-R: Dr. Shelley Tulloch, Dr. Jacqueline Romanow, Kwabena Kesseh, Dr. Gabriel Nemogá, Dr. Doug Goltz, following Kwabena’s defense of his thesis, “The impact of oil production on traditional livelihood: The case of Fanti peoples in Shama in the Western region of Ghana” in Fall 2019.

L-R: Dr. Shelley Tulloch, Dr. Jacqueline Romanow, Kwabena Kesseh, Dr. Gabriel Nemogá, Dr. Doug Goltz, following Kwabena’s defense of his thesis, “The impact of oil production on traditional livelihood: The case of Fanti peoples in Shama in the Western region of Ghana” in Fall 2019.

Participants a workshop

Indigenous Food Security Workshop- Cultivating Community Perspectives and Partnerships: held at the University of Winnipeg, organized by the Department of Indigenous Studies. Participants engaging in a sharing circle, exchanging stories/ experiences, and ideas on indigenous food security.

Students with Dr. Tobasonakwut Kinew

Pathways to Wisdom 2011 class with Late Dr. Tobasonakwut Kinew

Group shot - Jennifer Keith Thesis Defense

From L-R: Dr. Lorena Sekwan Fontaine, Dr. Peter Kulchyski, Dr. Julie A. Pelletier, Jennifer Keith, Dr. Jacqueline Romanow, and Dr. James Currie after Jennifer successfully defended her thesis, “The Thcho Agreement and Small Acts of Freedom: From Self-Governance to Self-Determination.” 2013.

Group shot - Colleen McIvor Thesis Defense

From L-R: Dr. Mark Ruml, Colleen McIvor, Dr. Julie A. Pelletier, Dr. Lorena Sekwan Fontaine and Dr. Glenn Moulaison after Colleen successfully defended her thesis, “Gikinoo’amaagowin Anishinaabeg (Teaching the Anishinaabe People).”

Group shot - Crystal Flamand Thesis Defense

From L-R: Dr. Glenn Moulaison, Dr. Mark Ruml, Crystal Flamand, Dr. Julie A. Pelletier, and Dr. Shailesh Shukla after Crystal successfully defended her practicum project, “Youth Empowerment Through Culture and Identity: Soul of the Pow Wow.”

Group shot - Darren Courchene Thesis Defense

From L-R: Dr. Lorena Sekwan Fontaine, Dr. Julie Pelletier, Darren Courchene, Dr. Mark Ruml, and Dr. Glenn Moulaison after Darren successfully defended his thesis, “Anishinaabe Gaagiikidoo Gaagii-Bi-Izhisemaagoowin.” Darren is now a lecturer at the University of Winnipeg and a PhD candidate.

Group shot - Gregory Querel Thesis Defense

L-R: Gregory Querel, Dr. Mavis Reimes, Dr. Shailesh Shukla, and Dr. Gabriel Nemogá, after Gregory successfully defended his thesis “Métis-Specific University Education: Beyond the Market-Based Model of Education.” Fall 2015.

Group shot - Margaret Ann (Tamara) Dicks Thesis Defense

L-R: Dr Jerome Fontaine, Dr. Gabriel Nemogá, Margaret Ann (Tamara) Dicks, and Dr. Glenn Moulaison, after Tamara defended her thesis “Exploring Drumming/Song and its Relationship to Healing in the Lives of Indigenous Women Living in the City of Winnipeg.” Fall 2014.

Group shot - Saima Siddiqui  Thesis Defense

L-R: Dr. Jeannie Kerr, Dr. Jamie Cidro, Shauna Therese MacKinnon, Dr. Julie A. Pelletier, and Saima Siddiqui after her thesis defense in 2018. Saima’s thesis was entitled “Urban Aboriginal Self-Government: An Analysis on Aboriginal Social Service Delivery in Winnipeg, MB.”

Group shot - Wabanakwut Kinew Thesis Defense

L-R: Dr. Jeannie Kerr, Dr. Lorena Sekwan Fontaine, Dr. Dr. James Currie, Wabanakwut Kinew, and Dr. Gabriel Nemogá following Wab’s defense of his thesis, “Aanakanootandaa Anishinaabemowin: Let’s Translate the Ojibwe Language” in Fall 2018.

The Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance is not accepting applications for Fall 2020.  Please check this web page for updated information regarding applications for Winter 2021.

The Department of Indigenous Studies (formerly the Aboriginal Governance Program) is grounded in the intellectual and cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples in Canada and around the globe. We welcome students from all backgrounds and disciplines to explore the unique complexities and broad, diverse cultures associated with Indigenous studies which include natural resources, economic development and Indigenous knowledge.  The Department of Indigenous Studies is proud to offer its students the opportunity to pursue a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance degree, which was established in 2008.

Join us as we examine Indigenous governance through Indigenous wisdom and multidisciplinary coursework in Indigenous/Aboriginal governance and disciplines like politics, anthropology, human ecology, sociology, law, history, religious studies, and conflict resolution studies. We recognize and honour the central role of language as carrier of culture, conveyor of tradition and knowledge, and signifier of individual and community identity by supporting the teaching of the Indigenous languages Ojibwe and Cree.

Graduate students will earn a Master of Arts in Indigenous Governance, preparing them for leadership and management positions within Indigenous governmental and non-governmental organizations, and in urban and other community-based organizations; or to further their educations in a variety of Ph.D. programs. For more information on our Graduate program, click here.