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Spring 2020 Courses

English


ENGL-1000-750 | ENGLISH 1A | A. Donachuck | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course provides an introduction to the academic study of literature through a focus on narrative form. Students will be given the interpretive tools to analyze narratives as they appear in the following genres of literature: poetry, drama, the short story, the novella, and the graphic novel. They will also be invited to consider how narratives structure discourses and encode meanings in film, television, visual images, news media, and popular culture. The course will emphasize terms and concepts that are central to the study of narrative, including point of view, unreliable narration, and narrative time. But it will also encourage students to look beyond the limits of narrative: to consider how and why literary texts sometimes fail to express narratives, and how they often contain structures different from those usually associated with narrative form. A series of skills workshops will introduce students to practices that are fundamental to literary scholarship, such as close reading, academic research, and essay writing.

ENGL-1000-751 | ENGLISH 1A | A. Donachuck | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course provides an introduction to the academic study of literature through a focus on narrative form. Students will be given the interpretive tools to analyze narratives as they appear in the following genres of literature: poetry, drama, the short story, the novella, and the graphic novel. They will also be invited to consider how narratives structure discourses and encode meanings in film, television, visual images, news media, and popular culture. The course will emphasize terms and concepts that are central to the study of narrative, including point of view, unreliable narration, and narrative time. But it will also encourage students to look beyond the limits of narrative: to consider how and why literary texts sometimes fail to express narratives, and how they often contain structures different from those usually associated with narrative form. A series of skills workshops will introduce students to practices that are fundamental to literary scholarship, such as close reading, academic research, and essay writing.

ENGL-1000-760 | ENGLISH 1A | N. LeGier | JUN17 – JUL28 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course will explore the presence of disability in literature. Disability pervades literature, but it is frequently not seen. Throughout this course, we will examine this phenomenon and the textual devices used to configure and reconfigure disability in literary texts. We will read texts from across the creative literary genres (novel, short fiction, and poetry) that contain disability or reference to disability. We will also consider the presence of disability in these from an interdisciplinary lens. Students will be encouraged to reflect upon how these works examine disability and how and why disability is important in them. We will study the formal elements of each genre, and question how form can influence the meaning of a text. Research techniques will be emphasized, and students will be introduced to and practice a variety of critical literary theories, while also considering the historical context in which the texts were produced. Assignments will reinforce the fundamentals of essay writing techniques while preparing students for more advanced literary study. Classes will combine formal lectures and quizzes, with online discussions on the texts discussed in class. There will be a midterm and a final exam, both of which will be passed into the instructor online.

ENGL-1001-760 | ENGLISH 1 | P. DEPASQUALE | MAY4 - JUN29 | This section is reserved for the Community-based Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (CATEP) and the Winnipeg Education Centre Program (WEC). ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This Nexus course is reserved for Access students. Students will develop critical reading and writing skills through the study of a variety of creative prose, poetry, and other forms of creative written expression. Classes are structured around online lectures of key concepts and contexts in addition to online class discussions of our readings. Significant time is spent developing the close reading, critical thinking, research, and academic essay writing skills needed to succeed in university English courses. Works studied include Katherena Vermette's River Woman and Waubgeshig Rice's Moon of the Crusted Snow.

ENGL-1003-760 | INTRO TOPICS IN LITERATURE | C. HUNTER | MAY4 – JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This online section of Topics in Literature will focus on fiction and poetry with close connections to Manitoba and explore the roles played by climate, culture, and history in these works. The texts will likely include short stories by Margaret Laurence, Gabrielle Roy, and Sinclair Ross; poetry by Rosanna Deerchild, Di Brandt, and others; and two novels, Fox by Margaret Sweatman and Some Great Thing by Lawrence Hill. The course, currently under construction, will be delivered mainly through a series of units posted on Nexus, which will include lectures, quizzes, writing exercises, and study tips to help students keep up with the course materials. Assignments will likely include short reading responses, essays, and a final exam.

ENGL-1003-770 | INTRO TOPICS IN LITERATURE | J. WILLS | MAY4 – JUN12 | MW 1PM – 4PM | Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions
This course introduces students to English literary studies through the study of some of the most notable American authors from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will gain an understanding of different literary movements, genres, and modes of expression, including romanticism, regionalism, life narrative, poetry, satire, and historical fiction. We will also explore genres, like the Western and the Hardboiled novel, that are integrally connected to American national identity as well as the cultural contexts in which those genres emerged. Special attention shall be paid to the ways that gender, sexuality, and class impact and are impacted by American nationalism. 

ENGL-1004-760 | INTRO READING CULTURE | R. CLEMENT | JUN17 – JUL28 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course explores how culture—broadly defined as a set of practices encompassing a range of texts, events, experiences, and social institutions—shapes the media that influences everyday lives. Students analyze cultural forms and practices such as written texts, film, television, visual and performance art, music, and electronic media. This course may be of special interest to students who plan on pursuing further work in cultural studies.

What is a “cultural text” and how does it relate to English literary studies? This will be the main focus of the course. This particular section will focus on the spaces and places of Canadian popular culture including how they were both created and contested, as well as influenced by popular culture from elsewhere. Beginning with a broad introduction to leading theories of communication and culture, this theoretical background will be applied to a range of different media from traditional analog storytelling and print media, through broadcast media like radio and television, and finally the digital media that define the current age. In addition to understanding how these media function as instruments of communication, students will also investigate how different cultural associations and individual identities are shaped through interaction with these media.

ENGL-1005-760 | READING TO WRITE | J. SCOLES | JUN17 – JUL28 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This section of Reading to Write Creatively will explore short fiction and poetry, specifically, as well as the many ways of writing within the two genres. Students read as writers, closely and actively, learning to hear the nuances, cadences, and signatures of working artists. By reading closely, analyzing, and discussing published texts, we will gain an understanding of the strategies and methods writers use to write effectively. Please note: this 6-week Spring-term course is not a shorter version of the 12-week course; rather, it’s an intensive complete course in half the time. Students are expected to devote a minimum of twelve to fifteen hours of work per week—the equivalent of six hours of in-class work & instruction, plus homework, assigned readings, Nexus peer-review sessions, and writing assignments.

ENGL-2102-760 | INTRO CREATIVE WRITING | J. SCOLES | MAY4 – JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
Students will concentrate on developing a significant portfolio of creative writing, including poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction. The course will introduce students to frameworks and strategies for developing creative work through improvisational writing exercises, close reading, discussion forums, and critical analysis. Key writing concepts—Voice, Plot, Setting, and Character, for example—will be explored in depth, and emphasis will be placed on the skills involved in drafting, self-editing, peer-reviewing, and work-shopping creative work, as well as the professional preparation and submission of manuscripts suitable for publication. Please note: this 6-week Spring-term course is not a shorter version of the 12-week course; rather, it’s an intensive complete course in half the time. Students are expected to devote a minimum of twelve to fifteen hours of work per week—the equivalent of six hours of in-class work & instruction, plus homework, assigned readings, Nexus peer-review sessions, and writing assignments.

ENGL-2603-760 | SHORT FICTION | A. BRICKEY | MAY4-JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
Neil Gaiman writes that “a short story is the ultimate close-up magic trick—a couple of thousand words to take you around the universe or break your heart.” This course introduces students to the rich and diverse genre of short fiction. From its beginnings in the nineteenth century with writers like Edgar Allan Poe and Herman Melville, to its contemporary iterations in the work of Alice Munro and Jhumpa Lahiri, we'll investigate whether there is something the short story does that its longer counterpart, the novel, does not do. We'll be asking questions about how form constrains meaning, whether short fiction is generically prone to allegory, and the role that small stories can play in our everyday lives. Readings will include work by writers such as James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Louise Erdrich, James Baldwin, and Jamaica Kincaid. Assignments will include an in-class analysis, an article summary, and a final paper.

ENGL-2603-761 | SHORT FICTION | A. BRICKEY | MAY4-JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
Neil Gaiman writes that “a short story is the ultimate close-up magic trick—a couple of thousand words to take you around the universe or break your heart.” This course introduces students to the rich and diverse genre of short fiction. From its beginnings in the nineteenth century with writers like Edgar Allan Poe and Herman Melville, to its contemporary iterations in the work of Alice Munro and Jhumpa Lahiri, we'll investigate whether there is something the short story does that its longer counterpart, the novel, does not do. We'll be asking questions about how form constrains meaning, whether short fiction is generically prone to allegory, and the role that small stories can play in our everyday lives. Readings will include work by writers such as James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Louise Erdrich, James Baldwin, and Jamaica Kincaid. Assignments will include an in-class analysis, an article summary, and a final paper.

ENGL-2604-770 | POETRY AND POETIC FORM | P.MELVILLE | MAY4-JUN15 | MW 10AM - 1230PM | Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions
This course is designed to introduce students to various features, forms, and figures of poetic discourse. While historical context informs lectures and class discussion, this section of the course proceeds, for the most part, according to the figural elements of poetry (such as rhythm and rhyme, diction and tone, metaphor and allegory). By engaging in thorough discussions and varied writing assignments, students learn to become more appreciative, alert readers of poetry, and in the process expand the possibilities of their own writing.

NOTE ON CLASS FORMAT: Classes will occur as a combination of synchronized livestreams on Zoom and shorter videos uploaded to the course Nexus website. Please note that, with some minor exceptions, livestreams will not typically be recorded/uploaded to Nexus. Attendance during the livestreams is therefore expected. Also keep in mind that, although classes are scheduled during 2.5-hour timeslots, livestream portions of each class will not likely exceed two hours (starting at 10am). Additional pre-recorded videos uploaded to Nexus will make up the remainder of each class.

ENGL-2613-760 | FANTASY FICTION | C. FAWCETT | JUN17 – JUL28 | TTH 9AM – 12PM | This section is reserved for the Community-based Aboriginal Teacher Education Program (CATEP) and the Winnipeg Education Centre Program (WEC). ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca MICROPHONE REQUIRED, WEBCAM OPTIONAL
As a long-time boys’ club, fantasy literature’s most well-known and well-read authors are male, yet this does not mean they are the only authors to shape and define the genre. This course will focus on iconic female voices in Fantasy writing across the history of the genre, taking into consideration their era and context, their response to their contemporaries, and the ways in which they disrupt the existing tropes and concepts of fantasy. We will start from fairy tales and work into contemporary texts, examining what makes the genre of Fantasy fantastic.

ENGL-2722-760 | POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE AND CULTURE | C. ANYADUBA | JUN17 – JUL28 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course introduces students to postcolonial literatures and cultures, in English. The crucial focus of the course is the fictional representation of schooling as a colonial practice. The school as a powerful institution of European colonisation has been a major theme of several literatures often associated with postcolonial studies. We explore the themes – as well as the experiences – of schooling in selected novels. We also explore the ways that writers and artists represent regimes and institutions of schooling as a colonial practice. Through a close reading of selected novels dealing with the experiences of colonial and postcolonial schooling in Africa, Europe, and North America, we interrogate the cultural, psychological, political, moral, and economic dimensions of schooling. We will situate our reading of selected novels within some basic themes of postcolonial studies such as genocide, neocolonialism, racism, alienation, double consciousness, hybridity, and mimicry.

ENGL-2922-760 | TOPICS IN WOMEN WRITERS | C. MANFREDI | MAY4 – JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course focuses on the debate about women’s role and place in Victorian society (1837-1901). In this course, I will be your guide as you explore a selection of poems written by Victorian women. Together we will consider the representation of motherhood and infanticide, Abolition, female sexuality, industrialization, science and evolution, and dinosaur fossils! Through in-person online lectures I will introduce you to individual poets (Felicia Hemans, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Christina Rossetti, Augusta Webster, Emily Pfeiffer, Mathilde Blind, Michael Field, Constance Naden, Mary Elizabeth Coleridge, May Kendall, and Amy Levy) and the historical contexts through which their poems emerged.

ENGL-3719-760 | LITERATURE OF MANITOBA | D. BRANDT | JUN3 – JUN29 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

The course will take place on NEXUS, through the month of June.  There are class times listed in the  calendar, but because everything will be in writing, students can log on and participate at any time.   The course will encourage creative dialogue in writing (both in prepared engagements and in "chat" responses) as much as is possible in that ormat. 

The idea of the course is to look at the Literature of Manitoba within a bi-cultural and multicultural framework, in the context of the ancient Indigenous literature of this region (as brilliantly collected in Nigaan Sinclair's and Warren Cariou's anthology, Manitowapaw:  Aboriginal Writings from the Land of Water, for example), in the context of the Metis founding culture of Manitoba, as well as in the traditions of English and American literature that Canadian literary writing in English is often in dialogue with, and the various multicultural traditions that inform and enrich Manitoba writing in the ongoing.

Did you know that Manitoba has played a central role in the development of Canadian literature, as the place where both modernist Canadian poetry and the modern Canadian novel were developed in the most important instances?   And that we have continued to produce significant trendsetting literature that is renowned across the country and around the world into the present moment?  Yeah!

Texts we'll be reading in the course include Duncan Mercredi's collection of poetry, Spirit of the Wolf in the City, and Dorothy Livesay's poetry anthology, The Self Completing Tree, Margaret Laurence's novel The Diviners, two plays:  Darrell Racine and Dale Lakevold's Stretching Hide, and Armin Wiebe's The Moonlight Sonata of Beethoven Blatz, David Arnason's short stories happily named The Happiest Man in the World, and Rosanna Deerchild's Calling Down the Sky.  Also Di Brandt's newest book of poetry, Glitter & fall:  Laozi's Dao De Jing, Transinhalations.

We'll talk a bit about the historical challenges of developing a regionally based literature here, as well as enjoy partaking in the riches of some of our most interesting texts!

ENGL-3719-761 | LITERATURE OF MANITOBA | R. YOUNKA | JUN3 – JUN29 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course explores the literary culture of the Canadian Prairies through texts written by Manitoba authors. Themes examined may include the pioneer experience, establishing new communities in unfamiliar territory while recalling a cultural history from another place; the experience of colonized Aboriginal peoples; different perceptions of nature and the land; small town and big city life; and the search for intellectual, social, and religious freedom amidst perceived parochialism. Authors studied may include Margaret Laurence, Martha Ostenso, Tomson Highway, Frederick Philip Grove, Gabrielle Roy, Kristjana Gunnars, Patrick Friesen, Miriam Toews, Beatrice Culleton Mosionier, Sandra Birdsell, David Arnason, Robert Kroetsch, and W.D. Valgardson.

ENGL-3724-760 | TOPICS IN RACE AND ETHNICITY | C. LYPKA | MAY5 – JUN11 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course will examine texts written by Métis women writers; the content in these texts will be difficult, dealing with the lived experience of colonization, (sexual) violence, and trauma. Selected texts will engage with themes of de/colonization, identity, race, and gender, and span multiple genres, including fiction, life writing, poetry, and graphic novels. In examining the writers’ use of literary forms as aesthetic, personal, and political sites, we will consider how they challenge and revitalize notions of Métis-ness within the Canadian understanding of “mixed heritage,” between ideas of white/settler and indigenous, rather than their own people and culture.

ENGL-4741-770 | SCREEN STUDIES: CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA AND THE NEW CINEPHILIA | A. BURKE | MAY5 – JUN11 | TTH 1PM - 4PM | Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions
Does the love of cinema catalyze or compromise the study of film? This course explores the concept of cinephilia, examining the ways in which the compulsion to watch films is entangled with the desire to write about them. The course will begin with a consideration of traditional forms of cinephilia that defined the post-war period and the cinematic new waves that emerged around the world in the 1960s and 70s. During this first phase of the course we will watch Douglas Sirk’s melodrama All That Heaven Allows (1955, USA) and consider its critical fate, from its marginalization as a “women’s picture” on its release to its elevation as a film classic in the decades that followed, a rise fueled by critical re-evaluations and cinematic homages, such as Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974, West Germany) and Todd Haynes’s Far From Heaven (2002, USA). Following this, the course will pivot to the present, taking up Girish Shambu’s recent call “For a New Cinephilia” in the Spring 2019 issue of Film Quarterly. If traditional cinephilia was largely defined by the crafting of best-of lists and the celebration of predominantly white male Euro-American genius, the new cinephilia Shambu identifies and desires is global in scope, diverse in constituency, and political in spirit. This new cinephilia, far from retreating into the world of film, demands that film open up the world and create new ways of seeing it. The new cinephilia, as Shambu puts it, “is fully in contact with the present global moment.”

In the spirit of the new cinephilia, which “lives comfortably both as URL (on the internet) and IRL (‘in real life’),” the course will not have a textbook. Readings will be provided as pdfs on Nexus and gleaned online, which has been the primary venue for the emergence and efflorescence of “the new cinephilia” as a critical concept and a spectatorial practice. Included among the readings will be works by Girish Shambu, Jonathan Goldberg, Paul Willemen, Susan Sontag, Thomas Elsaesser, Malte Halgener, Annette Kuhn, Kevin B. Lee, Sarah Keller, Adrian Martin, Jacques Rancière, Catherine Russell, Genevieve Yue, Belen Vidal, and others.

A full list of films, as well as information on how to access them, will be available on May 1. Films may include works by Lucrecia Martel, Mati Diop, Hong Sang-soo, Maren Ade, Thomas Petzold, Kelly Reichardt, Hou Hsiou-Hsien, Jia Zhangke, Sky Hopinka, Lynne Ramsay, and others. In addition to feature films, the course will also include short films, video essays, and artist film and video.

Students need not have any prior experience studying film. Part of the work of the course will be developing the basic skills to watch and write about film.

The course will be synchronous live discussion on Zoom on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:00p.m. to 4:00p.m. on Zoom.

ENGL-4742-760 | CULTURAL STUDIES: LAND | H. SNELL | MAY4 – JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
This course explores cultural theories about land produced in and across three regions: North America, Oceania, and the Caribbean. Since what counts as “theory” varies culturally, we begin by troubling this term. Using Leanne Simpson’s “Land as Pedagogy” as a springboard, we then consider the various forms in which theory and land might collide in fascinating and politically important ways. We focus on innovative theoretical engagements with land that deploy a wide range of types and genres, from poetry to film. Special emphasis is placed on texts that offer counterpoints to colonialist-imperialist views of land as property and resource. In our consideration of theory hailing from Oceania and the Caribbean, we also consider the relationship between land and water. Sea theory can be considered alongside land theory as an attempt to think critically about the world. 

Note that this is a compressed course that takes place over 6 weeks. There are accordingly twice as many “class” hours per week than in a regular course. Classes will consist of independent creative autoethnographic exercises designed to spark thinking about students’ own relationship with land; audio, video, or written reflections on what comes out of those exercises; online discussions; and -- provided everyone is able -- Zoom meetings. Any synchronous activity will proceed on the basis of class consensus regarding days and times. Supplementary course materials will be uploaded to NEXUS as well, including lecture notes, links to online resources, and questions for students to consider as they work independently.

Required texts are available as e-books. Most course readings and all course screenings are available free of charge.

GENG-7112-760 | TOPICS IN CULTURAL THEORY: LAND | H. SNELL | MAY4 – JUN12 | ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca
These courses focus on such questions as: What constitutes a text? How do questions of value relate to the distribution of power and authority? How do social differences such as race, ethnicity, class, and gender shape and unsettle cultural production and consumption over time? How may "cultural theory" and "critical theory" be situated in relation to one another?

GENG-7820-770 | TOPICS IN VISUAL CULTURES: CONTEMPORARY WORLD CINEMA AND THE NEW CINEPHILIA | A. BURKE | MAY5 – JUN11 | TTH 1PM - 4PM | Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions
Does the love of cinema catalyze or compromise the study of film? This course explores the concept of cinephilia, examining the ways in which the compulsion to watch films is entangled with the desire to write about them. The course will begin with a consideration of traditional forms of cinephilia that defined the post-war period and the cinematic new waves that emerged around the world in the 1960s and 70s. During this first phase of the course we will watch Douglas Sirk’s melodrama All That Heaven Allows (1955, USA) and consider its critical fate, from its marginalization as a “women’s picture” on its release to its elevation as a film classic in the decades that followed, a rise fueled by critical re-evaluations and cinematic homages, such as Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats the Soul (1974, West Germany) and Todd Haynes’s Far From Heaven (2002, USA). Following this, the course will pivot to the present, taking up Girish Shambu’s recent call “For a New Cinephilia” in the Spring 2019 issue of Film Quarterly. If traditional cinephilia was largely defined by the crafting of best-of lists and the celebration of predominantly white male Euro-American genius, the new cinephilia Shambu identifies and desires is global in scope, diverse in constituency, and political in spirit. This new cinephilia, far from retreating into the world of film, demands that film open up the world and create new ways of seeing it. The new cinephilia, as Shambu puts it, “is fully in contact with the present global moment.”

In the spirit of the new cinephilia, which “lives comfortably both as URL (on the internet) and IRL (‘in real life’),” the course will not have a textbook. Readings will be provided as pdfs on Nexus and gleaned online, which has been the primary venue for the emergence and efflorescence of “the new cinephilia” as a critical concept and a spectatorial practice. Included among the readings will be works by Girish Shambu, Jonathan Goldberg, Paul Willemen, Susan Sontag, Thomas Elsaesser, Malte Halgener, Annette Kuhn, Kevin B. Lee, Sarah Keller, Adrian Martin, Jacques Rancière, Catherine Russell, Genevieve Yue, Belen Vidal, and others.

A full list of films, as well as information on how to access them, will be available on May 1. Films may include works by Lucrecia Martel, Mati Diop, Hong Sang-soo, Maren Ade, Thomas Petzold, Kelly Reichardt, Hou Hsiou-Hsien, Jia Zhangke, Sky Hopinka, Lynne Ramsay, and others. In addition to feature films, the course will also include short films, video essays, and artist film and video.

Students need not have any prior experience studying film. Part of the work of the course will be developing the basic skills to watch and write about film.

The course will be synchronous live discussion on Zoom on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:00p.m. to 4:00p.m. on Zoom.