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Spring 2021 Courses

English


ENGL-1000-001 | English 1A | P. Robertson | MAY3 - JUN14 | MW 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: LIVE - Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

This course offers an introduction to university-level literary study, including the reading of creative literature (poetry, fiction, or drama); the theory and practice of literary criticism; the role of historical and cultural factors influencing literary texts; and research skills. Students' writing also receives significant attention.

ENGL-1000-002 | English 1A | A. Donachuk | JUN16 - JUL28 | TTH 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS - There will be no live lectures instead lectures will be pre-recorded and uploaded onto NEXUS. Students will participate in online discussion boards

This course provides an introduction to the academic study of literature through a focus on narrative form. Students will be given the interpretive tools to analyze narratives as they appear in the following genres of literature: poetry, drama, the short story, the novella, and the graphic novel. They will also be invited to consider how narratives structure discourses and encode meanings in film, television, visual images, news media, and popular culture. The course will emphasize terms and concepts that are central to the study of narrative, such as point of view, unreliable narration, and narrative time. But it will also encourage students to look beyond the limits of narrative: to consider how and why literary texts sometimes fail to express narratives and how they often contain structures different from those usually associated with narrative form. A series of skills workshops will introduce students to practices central to literary scholarship, such as close reading, academic research, and essay writing.

ENGL-1000-003 | English 1A | R. Clement | JUN16 - JUL28 | TTH 1PM – 4PM
Course Delivery: LIVE - Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

In order to provide an introduction to the academic study of literature, this course will examine and survey a selected variety of narrative forms and genres. Students will learn the skills required to critically analyze and interpret narratives from genres such as poetry, drama, fiction, non-fiction, comics, and games. They will also consider the structure of discourse and the emergence of narrative meaning in various forms of popular culture from film and television to digital media. By considering concepts that are central to the study of narrative, such as point of view, audience reception, and intertextuality, students will be prepared for further study in the field of literature. Touching on the key milestones in the evolution of written storytelling in English from its medieval origins to the 21st century, this course will consider both traditional canonical voices of literature as well as those often marginalized as English grew to become a global, multicultural literary culture.

ENGL-1001-245 | English 1 | D. Wolf | MAY3 - JUN28 | MWF 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+  - Live component WF 930AM - 12PM. ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

In this course, students will develop critical reading and writing skills through the study of a variety of novels, short stories, and poetry. Classes will be structured around brief lectures on key concepts and relevant critical and historical contexts and class discussions of the readings (written and oral). There is a significant writing component to the course so that students learn the fundamental research and writing skills needed for successfully completing a university-level English paper. This is a Nexus+ course which combines synchronous and asynchronous learning: students must be available Wednesdays and Fridays from 9:30 to noon for the synchronous live zoom component of the course. 

ENGL-1003-001 | Intro Topics in Literature: Horror Literature | J. Ball | MAY3 - JUN14 | TTH 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS - There will be no live lectures instead lectures will be pre-recorded and uploaded onto NEXUS. Students will participate in online discussion boards

This topics course focuses on Horror literature. We will explore how horror literature reflects social and cultural concerns of gender, race, sexuality, and politics. We will consider conventional horror, literary realism, and experimental narrative. We will examine concepts and themes associated with horror, including monsters, madness, and murder. Additionally, we will examine the formal techniques and common themes of horror literature, particularly as they concern narrative strategies and the role of the reader. Students will also receive instruction on writing, editing, and using MLA format to produce academic papers at the university level.
This course is taught via Nexus asynchronously. Students are responsible for viewing all material as it is released. Students must be sure to check the Nexus Course Site and their various university accounts and email addresses regularly.
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ENGL-1003-002 | Intro Topics in Literature | P. DePasquale | JUL5 - AUG17 | TTH 1PM – 4PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+  - Live component Thursdays from 1PM - 4PM. ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

This course introduces students to a variety of creative literature (poetry, drama, and/or fiction) through the lens of a particular theme, genre, nationality or period. Each section is a uniquely designed introduction to university-level literary study.

ENGL-1004-001 | Intro Reading Culture | B. Cornellier  | MAY3 - JUL28 | M 9AM -12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS - There will be no live lectures instead lectures will be pre-recorded and uploaded onto NEXUS. Students will participate in online discussion boards

This course considers original ways cultural texts are created from diverse historical and ideological practices of adaptation and the recoding of existing cultural material. Students shall explore a series of textual representations of the story of Princess Salome and the beheading of John the Baptist to anchor the critical and theoretical concepts under study. Literary and media texts studied will include short fragments from the New Testament, 19th Century Orientalist art, Oscar Wilde’s play, 20th Century “camp,” and Rita Hayworth’s peculiar performance of the femme fatale in 1950s Hollywood. By introducing some of the key concepts in cultural theory, this course shall provide students with an opportunity to expand their understanding of different textual practices and modes of cultural production, including theatre, cinema, visual arts, popular culture, subcultural production, and digital remixing. We will focus on the complex chains of production linking together texts, cultural contexts, and audiences/readers. As a result, students will be invited to reflect on what readers, consumers, and artists do with culture.

ENGL-1005-001 | Reading to Write | J. Scoles | JUN16 - JUL28 | MW 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS - There will be no live lectures instead lectures will be pre-recorded and uploaded onto NEXUS. Students will participate in online discussion boards

This course introduces students to a variety of creative literature from a writerly perspective. This section of Reading to Write Creatively will examine poetry and short fiction, specifically, as well as the many ways of writing within the two genres. Students read as writers, closely and actively, learning to hear the nuances, cadences, and signatures of working artists. By reading closely, analyzing, and discussing published texts, we will gain an understanding of the strategies and methods writers use to write effectively in their craft. This course is recommended for students who plan on taking further creative writing courses at the undergraduate level, as well as those who have an interest in pursuing creative writing as a profession.

Please note: this 6-week Spring-term course is an intensive, full (12-week-term) course completed in half the time. Students are expected to devote a minimum of twelve to fifteen hours of work per week—the equivalent of six hours of in-class work & instruction, plus homework, assigned readings, Nexus peer-review sessions, and writing assignments.

ENGL-2102-001 | Intro to Creative Writing | J. Scoles | JUN16 - JUL28 | TTH 1PM - 4PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS - There will be no live lectures instead lectures will be pre-recorded and uploaded onto NEXUS. Students will participate in online discussion boards

Students will concentrate on developing a significant portfolio of creative writing, including poetry, fiction and creative non-fiction. The course will introduce students to frameworks and strategies for developing creative work & craft through improvisational writing exercises, close reading, and critical analysis. Key writing concepts—Voice, Plot, Setting, and Character, for example—will be explored in depth, and emphasis will be placed on the skills involved in drafting, self-editing, peer-reviewing, and work-shopping creative work, as well as the professional preparation and submission of manuscripts suitable for publication. This section of the course is Nexus-based, and high-speed Internet is mandatory. This course is recommended for students who plan on taking further creative writing courses at the undergraduate level, as well as those who have an interest in pursuing creative writing as a profession. Please note: this 6-week Spring-term course is an intensive, full (12-week-term) course completed in half the time. Students are expected to devote a minimum of twelve to fifteen hours of work per week—the equivalent of six hours of in-class work & instruction, plus homework, assigned readings, Nexus peer-review sessions, and writing assignments.

ENGL-2603-001 | Short Fiction | A. Brickey | MAY3-JUN14 | TTH 1PM - 4PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+  - Live component Thursdays from 1PM - 4PM. ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

Neil Gaiman writes that “a short story is the ultimate close-up magic trick—a couple of thousand words to take you around the universe or break your heart.” This course introduces students to the rich and diverse genre of short fiction. From its beginnings in the nineteenth century with writers like Edgar Allan Poe and Herman Melville, to its contemporary iterations in the work of Jamaica Kincaid and Souvankham Thammavongsa, we'll investigate whether there is something the short story does that its longer counterpart, the novel, does not do. We'll be asking questions about how form constrains meaning, whether short fiction is generically prone to allegory, and the role that small stories can play in our everyday lives. Readings may include work by writers such as Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, Louise Erdrich, and James Baldwin. Assignments will include a close reading, an article summary, and a final paper. This course will be a Nexus + course, with recorded lectures accessible on Tuesdays and a live Reading Labs on Thursdays.

ENGL-2603-245 | Short Fiction | C. Fawcett | JUN17 - JUL27 | TTH 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+  - Live component Thursdays from 11AM - 12PM. ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

This course considers the short story both in its nineteenth century and contemporary forms. Short fiction in different English-speaking cultures, principally in England, the United States, and Canada, will be discussed.

ENGL-2604-001 | Poetry & Poetic Form | P. Melville | MAY3 – JUN14 | MW 10AM – 12PM 
Course Delivery: NEXUS+ - Live component Monday & Wednesday from 10AM - 12PM. ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

This course is designed to introduce students to various features, forms, and figures of poetic discourse. While historical context informs lectures and class discussion, this section of the course proceeds, for the most part, according to the figural elements of poetry (such as rhythm and rhyme, diction and tone, metaphor and allegory). By engaging in thorough discussions and varied writing assignments, students learn to become more appreciative, alert readers of poetry, and in the process expand the possibilities of their own writing.

NOTE ON CLASS FORMAT: Classes will occur as a combination of synchronized livestreams on Zoom and shorter videos uploaded to the course Nexus website. Please note that, with some minor exceptions, livestreams will not typically be recorded/uploaded to Nexus. Attendance during the livestreams is therefore expected.

ENGL-2722-001 | Postcolonial Literatures and Cultures: Schooling as a Colonial Practice | C. Anyaduba | JUN16 – JUL28 | MW 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS - The mode of instruction or delivery for this course is asynchronous online learning. There will be no live lectures via Zoom or similar virtual platforms. Students can access course materials any day/time of the week. Lectures will be pre-recorded and uploaded to NEXUS on a weekly basis. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

This course introduces students to postcolonial literatures and cultures, in English. The course also introduces students to postcolonial theory as a way of reading. The crucial focus of the course is the fictional representation of schooling as a colonial practice. Schooling has featured prominently in literatures often associated with postcolonial writing as a powerful practice of European colonization. Bearing this postcolonial concern in mind, we will explore the representations of schooling in selected novels. We will examine the ways that writers and artists portray regimes and institutions of schooling as a colonial practice. Through close, contextual and ideological readings of selected novels dealing with the experiences of colonial and postcolonial schooling in Africa, Europe, and North America, we will interrogate the biological, cultural, psychological, political, moral, and economic dimensions of schooling. While on the one hand we will attempt to read selected novels as examples of postcolonial literature, on the other we will interrogate them using some frameworks of postcolonial theory. We will further situate our reading of selected novels in some major themes of postcolonial studies such as genocide, Orientalism, double consciousness, hybridity, among others.

ENGL-2722-245 | Postcolonial Literature and Culture | A. Vali | MAY4 - JUN10 | TTH 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+- Live component Tuesday/Thursday 10AM - 12PM. Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

Violence & Victory in Postcolonialism is an introduction to postcolonial literatures in English. We will range between poetry, short and long-form fiction and one short play to explore the ideals of resistance to colonial and neocolonial authority/ies. Articles on literary criticism will be used to frame our understanding of the ways that people experienced (and are still experiencing), resisted (and are still resisting) and articulated the colonial history they deal with on a daily basis. Our experience will range from North America to Africa, the Middle East and South and East Asia and I encourage you to bring your own favorite texts and contexts to bear on our discussion and reading.

ENGL-2922-001 | Topics in Women Writers: Victorian Voices | C. Manfredi | MAY3 - JUN14 | MW 1PM - 4PM
Course Delivery: ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

"Topics in Women Writers: Victorian Voices" examines a selection of poems written by women (e.g., Felicia Hemans, Michael Field, and Amy Levy) during the Victorian period (1830s - 1900). In addition to considering the representation of motherhood and infanticide, sexuality, industrialization, and evolution, students will learn about the specific historical and cultural contexts from which the poems emerged. An emphasis will be placed on developing the skills of critical literary analysis. This course will be delivered through pre-recorded lectures and students will ask questions and share ideas through discussion boards.

ENGL-3719-250 | Literature of Manitoba | D. Brandt | JUN2 -JUN28 | MWF 1PM - 4PM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+ - Live component Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 1PM - 230PM. Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

In this course we will engage in a sampling of some of Manitoba/Manitowapow’s most interesting literary writing in several genres, paying attention to our province’s geographical location at the heart of Turtle Island, in the middle of Canada; and our particular history as the long-time homeland of First Nations and Métis people, as well as more recently, home to numerous immigrant peoples from many different places.

Manitoba/Manitowapow has played a strong role in the development of a robust modern literature in Canada, and particularly in developing internationally renowned creative multicultural and intercultural identifications and expressions. We can only read a small number of Manitoba/Manitowapow’s many exemplary literary texts in this course, but we can certainly catch the flavour of our province’s accomplished oeuvre, and come to a richer appreciation of the powerful historical, intercultural, and imaginative vectors intersecting in its creation.

We will look at elements of genre and gender, formal practices and innovations, intertextual influences and forward-looking vision, as part of our exploration of the featured texts. We begin with a brief look at traditional Indigenous hunting songs and lullabies, and traditional Ruthenian folksongs, forms of cultural expression that predate modern literary expression by millennia. We continue with a look at the rapid and radical formal innovations of literary modernism at the beginning of the 20th century, often directly influenced by traditional forms. We will continue with the study of more contemporary “postmodern” works, which often reflect profoundly hybrid multicultural engagements and inflections that are both locally rooted and globally informed.

This course gives registration priority to students in the Catep program, but we are accepting some other students as well, with permission from the Instructor. Please contact Professor Di Brandt at d.brandt@uwinnipeg.ca if you're interested in enrolling in "The Literature of Manitoba/Manitowapow" for the Spring term.

ENGL-3725-001 | Topics in Cultural Studies: Photography and Cultural Studies | A. Burke | MAY3 – JUN14 | MW 1PM - 4PM 
Course Delivery: LIVE - Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

From its very beginnings, Cultural Studies has been concerned with questions of representation, the ways in which the political and the pictoral converge, and the clash and conjunction of ideology and image. From snapshot photography to social media, this course investigates a history of thinking about images and their circulation. We will explore how the image mediates memory and how the photograph is a vehicle that transports the past into the present. How does photography function as a technology of memory, not simply for the individual, but for family, community, culture, nation, and diaspora?

The course begins with the formative work of Walter Benjamin, whose “The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Reproducibility” still sets the contemporary agenda for thinking about photography as a cultural practice and the photograph as an object, whether analogue or digital. From there, we will extend our analysis to questions of art, the archive, activism, and the ordinary. Photography has made its way into the gallery and now counts itself among the fine arts, but there is also the long history of its use for purposes of control and surveillance. Yet, at the same time, photography has frequently been harnessed for positive political ends, allowing suppressed and marginalized groups to make visible experiences and evidence of inequality and injustice. Finally, while photography has long been a mass practice and the primary mode through which everyday life is defined and documented, the ease of image-making in the digital age also makes it somewhat banal, as images are the primary currency in the frenzied circulations of social media.

Course readings will include works by critics, curators, and practitioners such as Walter Benjamin, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Laura Mulvey, Stuart Hall, bell hooks, Allan Sekula, Teju Cole, Paul Seesequasis, Jacqueline Hoàng Nguyễn, Sharon Zuromskis, Nicolas Mizroeff, Shawn Michelle Smith, Manthia Diawara, Nathan Jurgenson, and Minh-ha T. Pham, among others.

In addition to this reading about photography, we will examine works by several photographers including Eugène Atget, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Cindy Sherman, John Paskievich, Gordon Parks, Vivian Maier, and Malick Sidibé, among others.

Assignments will include critical and creative options, including a photography portfolio with written component that requires access to a camera phone or digital camera.

ENGL-3920-001 | Representations of Disability | N. LeGier | MAY3 - JUN28 | TTH 9AM - 11AM
Course Delivery: NEXUS+ - Live component May 6, May 20, June 3, June 17, and June 24. ONLINE - High speed internet is mandatory. Section material is accessed via nexus.uwinnipeg.ca

This course examines social, cultural, historical, political, and aesthetic ideas about disability as they are expressed in literary and cultural texts. Students use the skills of textual and theoretical analysis to examine a range of texts that may include novels, performance texts, poetry, short stories, children's and young people's texts, feature films, documentary films, visual art, graphic narratives, blogs, YouTube videos, and other texts generated by social media. Students consider representations of disability in relation to a wide range of topics including aging, creative identity, colonialism, culture, ethics, ethnicity, family, gender, human rights, imperialism, memory, mythology, nation, and sexuality.

ENGL-4403-001 | Author, Genre, Form| B. Christopher | MAY3 – JUN14 | TTH 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: LIVE - Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

This course takes as its focus adaptations and appropriations of Shakespeare and his works across a range of media. Focusing mainly on transmedia reworkings in film, music, television, comics, and video games from the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the course invites us to (re)consider the continuing centrality of Shakespeare to conceptions of literary and cultural “greatness.” Over the course of the term, through reading, listening to, viewing, and playing a range of engagements with Shakespeare and his plays, we will also use Shakespeare as a test subject to investigate the meanings and limits of adaptation and adaptation theory. Assignments will include a series of weekly mini-adaptations, short response papers, a presentation and a final research paper.

ENGL-7811-001 | Topics in Manuscript, Print, and Digital Cultures| B. Christopher | MAY3 – JUN14 | TTH 9AM - 12PM
Course Delivery: LIVE - Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

This course takes as its focus adaptations and appropriations of Shakespeare and his works across a range of media. Focusing mainly on transmedia reworkings in film, music, television, comics, and video games from the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, the course invites us to (re)consider the continuing centrality of Shakespeare to conceptions of literary and cultural “greatness.” Over the course of the term, through reading, listening to, viewing, and playing a range of engagements with Shakespeare and his plays, we will also use Shakespeare as a test subject to investigate the meanings and limits of adaptation and adaptation theory. Assignments will include a series of weekly mini-adaptations, short response papers, a presentation and a final research paper.

GENG-7820-001 | Topics in Visual Cultures: Hauntings| M. Leeder | MAY3 – JUN14 | MW 1PM - 4PM
Course Delivery: LIVE - Scheduled class times will take place using an online platform. Students are expected to be available during the posted lecture times for live streaming and/or group interactions

These courses focus on visual images, the circumstances of their production, and the variety of cultural and social functions they serve. The study of visual culture includes artefacts from all historical periods and cultures, as well as media such as film, television, and the internet. The discourses around seeing and the cultural construction of the visual are taken into account.