Courses By Department - Sciences

Anthropology

ANTH-2214 (3) Archaeological Field School
This course number allows students who complete a recognized archaeological field school weighted at three credit hours to transfer equivalent credit to the University of Winnipeg. Only field schools offering both a theoretical lecture component and an intensive field component are accepted. Students must meet all requirements set by individual field schools.   

ANTH-2220 (6) Archaeological Field School
This course number is designated for students who complete a recognized archaeological field school weighted at six credit hours to transfer equivalent credit to the University of Winnipeg. Only field schools offering both a theoretical lecture component and an intensive field component are accepted. Students must meet all requirements set by individual field schools. Note: Students must receive departmental permission to enrol in an outside field school for academic credit.  

ANTH-3203(6) Archaeological Field School
An intensive course planned and programmed to provide students with practical archaeological experience through excavation of one or more sites. Instruction begins shortly after regular session examinations, and employs lecture, field, and laboratory components in order to teach excavation techniques, processing, analyzing and interpreting of archaeological data.          
REQUISITES: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1003 and ANTH-2200
RESTRICTIONS: Department Permission Required          

ANTH-3273(3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Indigenous History, Field Course         
In this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways in which Indigenous and European technologies of the fur trade era complemented each other. The first half of the course is taught through seminar discussions and lectures at the University of Winnipeg/WEC, the second half of the course takes place at the ANPO-Bison Ranch, near Rossburn, Manitoba, where students have an opportunity to work with Indigenous Elders from the nearby First Nations communities, learn about and experience traditional technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional tipis and/or modern tents. Students should notify the instructor in case of dietary restrictions, plant-, animal-, or food allergies. At the 4000-level, a greater amount of written work and more in-depth primary research are required.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4273 | HIST-3573 | HIST-4573
CROSS-LISTED: HIST-3573(3), HIST-4573(3)

ANTH-4230(6) International Field School
This field school in Archaeology and Bioarchaeology provides in-depth training in excavation, documentation, and analysis of material from an archaeological site and is typically located outside Canada (previous sessions were held in Serbia and Jamaica). Undergraduate students from University of Winnipeg are given preference in registration, however, the field course is open to upper undergraduate and graduate students from other universities. Students are required to consult the Department chair regarding the yearly location of the field course.  
REQUISITES: ANTH-2200 and ANTH-2300
RESTRICTIONS: Instructor Permission Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and BANT-4230

ANTH-4273 (3) Material Culture in Northern Plains Indigenous History, Field Course
Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum) In this experiential-learning course, we explore various ways in which Indigenous and European technologies of the fur trade era complemented each other. The first half of the course is taught through seminar discussions and lectures at the University of Winnipeg/WEC, the second half of the course takes place at the ANPO-Bison Ranch, near Rossburn, Manitoba, where students have an opportunity to work with Indigenous Elders from the nearby First Nations communities, learn about and experience traditional technologies, such as tanning hides and/or manufacturing archery equipment, while being accommodated in traditional tipis and/or modern tents. Students should notify the instructor in case of dietary restrictions, plant-, animal-, or food allergies. At the 4000-level, a greater amount of written work and more in-depth primary research are required.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-3273 | HIST-3573 | HIST-4573
CROSS-LISTED: HIST-3573(3), HIST-4573(3)

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Applied Computer Science

ACS-3700 (3) Health Informatics Practicum     
Health Informatics Practicum is a work placement in a healthcare environment. The course facilitates professional working experience in a sponsoring health-related organization. The evaluation of the student's performance is determined by the employer's performance evaluation, a work-term performance report submitted by the student, and the departmental co-operative supervisor's evaluation. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. Approval must be obtained from the supervising faculty member as well as from the Department Chair before enrollment. This course can only be take once for credit towards a 3-year BA/BSc ACS degree program (Health Informatics Stream).
REQUISITES: Students should normally have completed 30 credit hours in the Health Informatics Stream and a 3.0 GPA or Department Chair's permission.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and COOP-3999

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Bioanthropology

BANT-4230(6) International Field School
This field school in Archaeology and Bioarchaeology provides in-depth training in excavation, documentation, and analysis of material from an archaeological site and is typically located outside Canada (previous sessions were held in Serbia and Jamaica). Undergraduate students form University of Winnipeg are given preference in registration, however, the field course is open to upper undergraduate and graduate students from other universities. Students are required to consult the Department Chair regarding the yearly location of the field course.
REQUISITES: ANTH-2200 and ANTH-2300
RESTRICTIONS: Instructor Permission Required. Students may not hold credit for this course and ANTH-4230
CROSS-LISTED: ANTH-4230

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Biochemistry

BCHM-2119(3) Summer Institute in Disease and Policy   
A team of professionals presents advances to students on biomedical, clinical, diagnostic, epidemiological, sociological, and other aspects of diseases and health conditions, including indigenous healing. The course evaluates their impacts on the well-being of the global populace. Human rights, aboriginal and indigenous issues, gender, sexuality, human potential, economics, business and development, etc, are addressed. Lectures and round table discussions engender dialogue. Principles of "Responsibility to Protect" and "Strategic Engagement" are explored in developing public policy, to entrench global health and the other noble values. Assignments differ at each level. This course can be repeated for credit when the topic varies.
REQUISITES: 30 credit hours in an UG program; including at least 3 credit hours of 1000 level (or higher) in Biology, or permission of the instructor.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and MULT-2119.
CROSS-LISTED: MULT-2119.

BCHM-4119(3) Summer Institute in Disease and Policy   
A team of professionals presents advances to students on biomedical, clinical, diagnostic, epidemiological, sociological, and other aspects of diseases and health conditions, including indigenous healing. The course evaluates their impacts on the well-being of the global populace. Human rights, aboriginal and indigenous issues, gender, sexuality, human potential, economics, business and development, etc, are addressed. Lectures and round table discussions engender dialogue. Principles of "Responsibility to Protect" and "Strategic Engagement" are explored in developing public policy, to entrench global health and the other noble values. Assignments differ at each level. This course can be repeated for credit when the topic varies.
REQUISITES: 30 credit hours in an UG program; including at least 3 credit hours of 1000 level (or higher) in Biology, or permission of the instructor.
RESTRICTIONS: Students may not hold credit for this course and MULT-4119.
CROSS-LISTED: MULT-4119.

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Biology

BIOL-2401(1) FOREST ECOLOGY FIELD SKILLS COURSE
This intensive two-week field course is mandatory for students in the Forest Ecology program and is designed to give students field survival and basic forestry skills. Topics include bush camp construction; safe use of boats, ATV's, and chain saws; and basic bush survival skills. Students also learn how to correctly use topographical maps, compasses, air photos, GIS maps and other forestry equipment. This course is offered at Keewatin Community College at The Pas, Manitoba.
PREREQUISITES: This course is also listed as KC.RRR.1200/1 in the KCC general calendar.
CROSS-LISTED: Environmental Studies ENV-2401/1

BIOL-3112(3) ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION OF MAMMALS 
The ecology and evolution of living mammals is examined by considering aspects of their evolutionary history, behaviour and ecology, drawing comparisons with other vertebrate groups. Lab exercises expose students to a variety of methods used in research on mammals (e.g., analysis of carnivore diet, acoustic analysis, behavioural research, radio-telemetry). Guest presentations and field trips expose students to opportunities for professional work with mammals and other vertebrates (e.g., work in wildlife biology, zoos, provincial or federal parks).
PREREQUISITES: BIOL-2403(3) and BIOL-2111(6) or BIOL-2451(3)

BIOL-3452(3) BEHAVIOURAL ECOLOGY AND THE PRAIRIE GRASSLANDS: FIELD COURSE 
This course focuses on the ecology, evolution and behaviour of animals living in grassland habitats. Students develop basic field skills and familiarity with the scientific process while addressing questions about predation, social behaviour, parental care and communication in species as diverse as rattlesnakes, bison, nesting hawks and mule deer. The course takes place at three significant prairie sites: the tail grass prairie of Manitoba, Grasslands National Park in Saskatchewan, and the Mclntyre Ranch in Alberta. Students need to be prepared to live and work outside in a variety of weather conditions.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL-2403/3 OR BIOL-2451/3 AND 1 OF EITHER STAT-1201/6. STAT-1501/3, GEOG-2309/3 OR PSYC-2101/

BIOL-4451(2) FOREST ECOSYSTEMS FIELD COURSE 
This is an intensive three-week field course designed to give students a comprehensive overview of forest ecology field skills. Topics include field and laboratory exercises in boreal and urban forestry; tree and plant identification; classification of forest types; forest management and environmental impact; soil classification; forest succession; dendrochronology; forest measurement; forest protection and silviculture.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL-2153(3) and BIOL-2403(3).
RESTRICTIONS: This course is intended for students enrolled in the Forest Ecology Program in Environmental Studies. Students not in this program but wishing to take this course need the permission of the instructor.

BIOL-4453(3) WETLANDS ECOSYSTEMS FIELD COURSE 
This course deals with the methods for studying the ecology of lakes, rivers and streams, and marshes: three major freshwater habitats found in Manitoba. Students will examine the methods for sampling and analyzing data on the chemical, physical, and biological components of these habitats. The adaptations of animals and plants to freshwater ecosystems will be emphasised.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL-2403(3), or the former BIOL-3403(3) or BIOL-3402(6)

BIOL-4473(3) DENDROCHRONOLOGY: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
This course constitutes an introduction to dendrochronology; the science oftree-ring analysis. Dendrochronology is particularly appropriate for students with interests in the chronological and dynamical aspects of tree growth, forest ecology, climatology, hydrology, geomorphology, and anthropology/archaeology. The history, principles and applications ofdendrochronology are reviewed in this course. Problems related to the sampling and dating of tree-ring series; the development of chronological series, the analysis and interpretation ofdendrochronological data are also be emphasized. This course includes a compulsory field trip during the second or third weekend of the course.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL"2403(3) or the former BIOL-3403(3) and BIOL-2153(3) or permission of the instructor

BIOL-4602(3) FIELD RESEARCH IN ANIMAL ECOLOGY AND ENERGETICS
This course covers field and laboratory methods for studying ecological energetics and evolutionary physiology of free ranging wild animals. During a field camp before the start of fall term, students learn techniques for studying metabolism and energy balance in animals including small mammal trapping/identification, temperature radiotelemetry, and open-circuit respirometry. The course focuses on small mammals, but there are opportunities to study songbirds, and some non-endothermic vertebrates and invertebrates. Each student conducts an independent research project during the field camp, and presents this work in a seminar and term paper during fall term.
PREREQUISITES: BIOL-2403 (3), BIOL-2451 (3), BIOL- 3602 (3), BIOL-3603 (3), or BIOL-3492 (3). A minimum of 15 credit hours in Biology at or above the 2000 level.

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Environmental Studies

ENV-2401(1) FOREST FIELD SKILLS CAMP
This intensive two-week field course is mandatory for students in the Forest Ecology program and is designed to give students field survival and basic forestry skills. Topics include bush camp construction; safe use of boats, ATV's, and chainsaws; and basic bush survival skills. Students also learn how to correctly use topographical maps, compasses, air photos, GIS maps and other forestry equipment. This course is offered at University College of the North at The Pas, Manitoba.
CROSS-LISTED: Biology BIOL-2401(1)

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Geography

GEOG-4404(3) FIELD RESEARCH IN URBAN GEOGRAPHY
This course investigates, examines and appraises the major varieties of primary and secondary materials available for the study of urban areas. Particular emphasis will be placed on the acquisition and evaluation of local material, and the course will therefore call for students to be engaged in field research. (This course alternates with GEOG-4403(3).
PREREQUISITES: GEOG-2414(3) or GEOG-2415(3) or the former GEOG-2404(6)

GEOG-4801(3) PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY FIELD SEMINAR
This course deals with the practical methodologies and problems in field research. Students will be introduced to the necessary skills required for field research. Areas of investigation will depend on the Instructors) involved. This course involves: one (1) week of field work at an off-campus venue; six (6) three-hour seminars during the fall academic term; laboratory time as required.
PREREQUISITES: the former GEOG-2201(6), or GEOG- 2218(3) and GEOG-2219(3), and the former GEOG-2203(6) and permission of instructor. Additional courses in Physical and Techniques Geography (in consultation with the instructor) are recommended.

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Radiation Therapy

CCMB-2904 (3) Clinical Education I
Students will apply basic concepts of radiation therapy to the planning and delivery of treatment. Opportunities to plan and deliver treatment, as well as to interact with patients; will be provided. This clinical is an orientation to the profession of radiation therapy, and is conducted under the supervision of a registered radiation therapist (R.T.T.). The focus will be on assessment, evaluation, communication, and application of theory to clinical practice. 
REQUISITES: Admission to the Radiation Therapy Program, CCMB-2901, CCMB-2902, CCMB-2903, CCMB-2520

CCMB-3914 (3) Clinical Education II
Students will apply concepts of radiation therapy to clinical practice under the supervision of a registered radiation therapist (R.T.T.). The focus will be on the planning and delivery of radiation treatment, as well as assessment, communication, and teaching skills. Opportunities to problem solve through applications of knowledge to the clinical situation, will be provided.
REQUISITES: Admission to the Radiation Therapy Program, CCMB-2911, CCMB-2912, CCMB-2913, CCMB-2530 or the former PHYS-2530, CCMB-2540. CCMB-3901 or CCMB-2510 must be taken previously or at the same time as this course.

CCMB-3924 (6) Clinical Education III
The student is assigned to a variety of clinical areas, with the majority of time spent in the planning and delivery of treatment. Students continue to apply fundamental concepts of radiation therapy to the care of cancer patients of all ages, and their families, during the time in which they are undergoing radiation therapy. The focus will be on the critical thinking, communication skills, team work, and advocacy. The level of clinical responsibilities is increased as the student performs competencies under the supervision of a registered radiation therapist (R.T.T.).
REQUISITES: Admission to the Radiation Therapy Program. CCMB-3914, CCMB-3903 must be taken concurrently.

CCMB-3934 (6) Clinical Education IV
The student will continue to apply fundamental concepts of radiation therapy, mainly in planning and delivery of care to cancer patients of all ages, and their families, during the time in which the patient is undergoing treatment. The level of clinical responsibilities is increased as the student performs competencies under the supervision of a registered radiation therapist (R.T.T.). The clinical practice outcomes of this course begin to integrate the professional responsibilities of an RTT in the domains of cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills. Students will be required to attend the Western Manitoba Cancer Centre in Brandon for a minimum 2 week rotation.
REQUISITES: Admission to the Radiation Therapy Program, CCMB-3924

CCMB-3944 (6) Advanced Clinical Education V
The student continues to apply concepts of radiation therapy, in planning and delivery of care to cancer patients and their families, during the time in which the patient is undergoing treatment. The level of clinical responsibilities and complexity is increased from Advanced Clinical Education IV as the student performs competencies under the supervision of a registered radiation therapist (R.T.T.) The clinical practice outcomes of this course correlate with the entry-level professional responsibilities of an RTT in the domains of cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills. Students are required to attend at the Western Manitoba Cancer Centre in Brandon for a minimum 2 week rotation.
REQUISITES:  Admission to the Radiation Therapy Program, CCMB-3934, CCMB-4902.

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