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Fairy-Tale Cultures and Media Today

Women's & Gender Studies


In August, 2014, eight scholars from four countries presented the latest in international fairy-tale research at the University of Winnipeg. In this public event, speakers addressed fairy-tale film, television, fan fiction, oral tradition, postcoloniality, pornography, and crime and justice.  The presentations happened in conjunction with first meeting of the Fairy-Tale Cultures and Media Today project, led by Pauline Greenhill.  This group produces innovative interdisciplinary fairy-tale theory and analysis, and supports new linked approaches to the complex topic of fairy tales’ continued relevance in oral and written traditions and adaptation to new media and locations.

This open, public event, and its presentation here were made possible through funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and support from our Partners: the University of Winnipeg, Brigham Young University, University of Hawaii, University of Amsterdam, and Memorial University of Newfoundland. We would like to thank Praba Pilar for videography and editing.

The visiting scholars were Cristina Bacchilega (University of Hawaii), Anne Kustritz (University of Amsterdam), Martin Lovelace (Memorial University of Newfoundland), Jill Terry Rudy (Brigham Young University), Sadhana Naithani (Jawaharlal Nehru University), and Jack Zipes (University of Minnesota).

They joined UW’s own Steven Kohm (Criminal Justice Studies) and Cat Tosenberger (English).

 

The speeches from the event can be accessed online through the following links:

1) Dr. Pauline Greenhill (University of Winnipeg, Women’s and Gender Studies), Introductory talk

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yn5-70BkZWc)

 

2) Dr. Cat Tosenberger (University of Winnipeg, English), "Beauties and More Beauties: Fairy Tales and Pornography"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVSVnG0-95o)

 

3) Dr. Jack Zipes (University of Minnesota), "Harry Potter, the Sorcerer’s Apprentice and Memetic Magic"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eB9fwQSZcyE)

 

4) Dr. Cristina Bacchilega (University of Hawaii), "Adaptations in a Wordly Fairy-Tale Web: Reading Globalectically?"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ke-Z3D-TD9A)

 

5) Dr. Martin Lovelace (Memorial University of Newfoundland), "Peg and Her Sisters: Scripts for Women’s Lives in Newfoundland Magic Tales"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYZIRc2CU1o)

 

6) Dr. Jill Terry Rudy (Brigham Young University), "Visualizing Wonder: Digital Humanities Meets Intermedial Fairy Tailes"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WaxUQkFU0zE)

 

7) Dr. Sadhana Naithani (Jawaharlal Nehru University), "A Fairy Tale Called India: Postcolonial and Cinematic"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYvvkneP0G8)

 

8) Dr. Anne Kustritz (University of Amsterdam), "Transmedia Seriality from Folk Culture to Corporate Culture"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vEhrmO8BY8)

 

9) Dr. Steven Kohm (University of Winnipeg, Criminal Justice Studies), "Citizens of A Different Town"

(https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1uFu5ZwJXBs)