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Courses 2019-20

Urban and Inner City Studies


2019-20 Academic Year 

Click here to dowload UIC 2019-20 Timetable. 

Fall 2019

 

UIC-1001 (3) Introduction to Urban and Inner-City Studies (3 hrs Lecture)

The course provides an overview of the dynamics that drive a city's growth and that produce change over time. It considers the social impact of urban change, with particular emphasis on the interconnectedness of the different parts of the city and on the impact of urban change on the inner city. It examines how these changes shape city politics, looking at the political interests and problems associated with the commercial core, older residential neighborhoods near the centre, and burgeoning suburban and exurban areas. It also examines how the three levels of government are involved in shaping and responding to these changes.

UIC-1010 (3) Indigenous Ways of Knowing (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion)

Large numbers of Indigenous peoples settling in Winnipeg, and in core neighbourhoods, suggest that students studying urbanism need to be aware that the city and critical issues in the inner city can be interpreted differently. This course offers an introduction to Indigenous ways of knowing through active participation in strategies that facilitate the production of Indigenous knowledge and through comparisons with Euro-American ways of knowing. By taking part in basic ceremony and related practices, students gain an understanding of how First Peoples of Manitoba relate to each other, to the land, to other animals, and to the world. Cross-listed: IS-1010(3).

UIC-1012 (3) Dynamics of the Inner City (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion)

This course exposes students to inner-city life, experienced through field trips to meet with formal and informal community leaders and community-based organizations. Students benefit from presentations by those whose calling and work focuses on critical inner-city issues. We observe changes arising from resiliency, activism, multiculturalism, and the blending of social justice and traditional Indigenous values. Students explore the inner-city life of Indigenous peoples and newly-arrived Canadians. Classes emphasize discussion and "inner-city stories".

UIC-2020 (3) Colonization and Indigenous Peoples (3 hrs Lecture)

This course examines the Indigenous colonial experience, particularly in Western Canada, and the impact colonization has had and continues to have on the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canadian governments. This course emphasizes the contemporary effects of colonization, particularly as regards identity issues and how they play out in the urban and inner-city environment, and also processes and strategies for decolonization. Cross-listed: POL-2020(3) and IS-2020(3).

Introduction to Community Advocacy - UIC 2210(3)

This course examines ways of influencing public policy, especially around issues related to urban poverty. How can we work effectively to promote positive change with respect to such issues as housing, and social assistance? This course has the effect of empowering students. It is a core course in the UICS Department’s Certificate in Community Advocacy

UIC-3025 (3) Issues in Sustainable Cities (3 hrs Lecture)

This course addresses issues of sustainable urban development. Topics may include the following: world population growth and urbanization in developed and developing countries; the impact of technology, trade, and commercial globalization on urban environments; the degradation of land, water, and air inside cities and in their bio-regions; the consumption of fossil fuels and the local and global impact of their combustion; the politics of sustainable urban development; the role of planning and urban administrative practices and policies in environmental degradation and mitigation; and the place of local environmental initiatives in national environmental actions. Cross-listed: ENV-3025(3).

UIC-3240 (3) Poverty and the Law (3 hrs Lecture)

This course focuses on poverty law as it affects the individual and the community. It offers the student insight into the legal and administrative regimes governing the lives of persons of low or modest income. From the theoretical and practical perspective, it explains how certain laws may act as barriers to the full participation of disadvantaged persons in a free and democratic society. Finally, the course examines how the law can be used to advance the interests of persons of low and modest incomes. Note: This course was formerly numbered UIC-3040 and had the same subject material.

UIC-3060 (3) Confronting Racism in the Inner City (3 hrs Lecture)

This course helps students understand what racism is, how it's expressed in Winnipeg's inner city and what factors contribute to its existence. The course provides practical tools for confronting racism, awareness and skill-building around dealing with internalized racism, and guidelines to becoming an ally with those experiencing the brunt of oppression that racism creates. The course emphasizes student participation and discussion and in-depth analysis of ideologies that underlie race-based practices, specifically with respect to Indigenous populations. 

UIC-3430 (3) Housing and the Neighbourhood (3 hrs Lecture)

This course examines the complexity of shelter environments within the urban landscape. The focus is on the North American housing market, the history of housing, and the ways in which traditional and non-traditional markets are defined and understood. The unique characteristics of the modern city are examined as they are manifested in homelessness, marginal housing forms, shelter-induced poverty, suburban decline, and inner-city issues. Emphasis is also placed on current/historical policy and program responses to housing-related issues at the neighbourhood, municipal, provincial and federal level. Cross-listed: GEOG-3430(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and GEOG-3430. Requisite Courses: UIC-1001 or GEOG-1102 [prerequisite(s)].

Winter 2020

UIC-1001 (3) Introduction to Urban and Inner-City Studies (3 hrs Lecture)

The course provides an overview of the dynamics that drive a city's growth and that produce change over time. It considers the social impact of urban change, with particular emphasis on the interconnectedness of the different parts of the city and on the impact of urban change on the inner city. It examines how these changes shape city politics, looking at the political interests and problems associated with the commercial core, older residential neighborhoods near the centre, and burgeoning suburban and exurban areas. It also examines how the three levels of government are involved in shaping and responding to these changes.

UIC-1012 (3) Dynamics of the Inner City (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion)

This course exposes students to inner-city life, experienced through field trips to meet with formal and informal community leaders and community-based organizations. Students benefit from presentations by those whose calling and work focuses on critical inner-city issues. We observe changes arising from resiliency, activism, multiculturalism, and the blending of social justice and traditional Indigenous values. Students explore the inner-city life of Indigenous peoples and newly-arrived Canadians. Classes emphasize discussion and "inner-city stories".

UIC-2001 (3) Community Development (3 hrs Lecture)

This course is an introduction to the idea of community development and community economic development. The course considers the principles and philosophy of community development/community economic development, and examines the key elements of CD/CED including neighborhood revitalization,housing development and rehabilitation, employment development and training, and social enterprise. Cross-listed: IS-2301(3).

UIC-2010 (3) Metis Identity, Culture and Rights (3 hrs Lecture)

This course provides an overview of Métis culture, history and governance, explores current issues faced by the Métis. Significant court cases such as the historic Manitoba Métis Federation Land Claims case, and the Powley, Goodon and Daniels cases are examined. Federal and provincial issues such as jurisdiction, and finding inequalities are also considered. The aim is to provide students with a better understanding of the Métis Nation and specifically the Manitoba Métis community. Restriction: Students who have credit for UIC-3100, Issues in Urban and Inner-City Studies, when the topic was Métis Identity, Culture and Rights cannot take this course for credit.


UIC-2020 (3) Colonization and Indigenous Peoples (3 hrs Lecture)

This course examines the Indigenous colonial experience, particularly in Western Canada, and the impact colonization has had and continues to have on the relationship between Indigenous peoples and Canadian governments. This course emphasizes the contemporary effects of colonization, particularly as regards identity issues and how they play out in the urban and inner-city environment, and also processes and strategies for decolonization. Cross-listed: POL-2020(3) and IS-2020(3). 

UIC-2220 (3) Urban Poverty and Policy (1 hrs Lecture | 2 hrs Seminar/Discussion)

Urban poverty is a growing problem throughout the world, including Canada. It is affected by a wide range of policies. This course examines urban poverty through the lens of these various policies, considering their origins, impact, adequacy and ideological character.

UIC-3025 (3) Issues in Sustainable Cities (3 hrs Lecture)

This course addresses issues of sustainable urban development. Topics may include the following: world population growth and urbanization in developed and developing countries; the impact of technology, trade, and commercial globalization on urban environments; the degradation of land, water, and air inside cities and in their bio-regions; the consumption of fossil fuels and the local and global impact of their combustion; the politics of sustainable urban development; the role of planning and urban administrative practices and policies in environmental degradation and mitigation; and the place of local environmental initiatives in national environmental actions. Cross-listed: ENV-3025(3).

UIC-3030 (3) Urban and Community Planning (3 hrs Lecture)

Urban planning is a process that has importance for the quality of life of those who live in inner-city and downtown neighbourhoods. According to Friedmann, planning is an interdisciplinary field that "links knowledge to action". This course examines traditions, theories, and values in planning practice and highlights the important role in planning of civil society and community. Broad approaches to planning in Canada, the USA, and Britian and specific processes and policies in Winnipeg provide students with background in planning systems. The emphasis in this course is on practical knowledge and skills for community organizers. Cross-listed: GEOG-3432(3). Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and GEOG-3432. Requisite Courses: UIC-1001 or UIC-2001 or GEOG-1103 or permission of the instructor [prerequisite(s)].


UIC-3050 (3) Immigration and the Inner City (3 hrs Lecture)

This course explores both long-standing and recent questions about immigration and the inner city. Topics include the impact on contemporary inner-city communities of immigration; globalization; international and transnational social and economic developments; and civil wars, internal wars, and violent conflicts. Students' inquiry into the relationship between immigration and the inner city involves an exploration of both early and contemporary
discourse on the subject.

UIC-3210 (3) Community Organizing for Social Justice (3 hrs Seminar/Discussion)

This course examines a range of strategies for promoting change in urban settings. Students study theories and historical examples of various kinds of social justice-focused community organizing. Local, national and international cases are examined. Examples may include, but are not limited to: neighbourhood-level organizing; feminist approaches to organizing; youth-led organizing, Indigenous models of organizing; forms of civil disobedience; policy advocacy and lobbying; and the use of the media in community organizing.

UIC-3220 (6) Community Advocacy Internship (3 hrs Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 3 hrs Lecture)

This experiential learning course provides students an opportunity to put advocacy theories into practice through an internship with a community-based organization. Prior to the beginning of the course, the instructor works with students to identify a placement aligned with their specific advocacy interests and acts as a liaison between the placement supervisor and students. In addition to attending an internship one day (6 hrs.) per week, students participate in a monthly seminar led by the instructor. Students write reflection papers on their workplace experiences in relation to advocacy theories and prepare a final paper and class presentation. Restriction: Students may not hold credit for this course and UIC-3001(6). Requisite Courses: UIC-2210 [prerequisite(s)].