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1000-Level Course Descriptions

English


FALL 2017

English 1A: Genres of English Literature | ENGL-1000.3-001 | P. Melville |TTH 10:00 – 11:15

This course introduces students to the major genres of English literature, including poetry, drama, and fiction.  Although historical context will inform lectures and class discussion, the course will proceed, for the most part, according to the formal elements of each genre.  Students will be asked to consider how form contributes to the meaning of a work of literature.  With emphasis on the technical aspects of genre, the course will also encourage students to consider the socio-political conditions that likewise “structure” our own interpretations of literature.  How does gender complicate the sonnet or the structure of a short story?  What about race?  To what extent can literary form be re-structured to produce new and unexpected significance?  By engaging in thorough discussions and varied writing assignments, students will learn to become more appreciative, critical readers of literature, and expand the possibilities of their own writing.

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-002 | J. Jacobson-Konefall | MW 14:30 – 15:45

Description TBA

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-003 | A. Barkman-Hill | TTH 11:30 – 12:45

This course introduces students to a broad study of literature from a range of periods and regions. As a class, we will explore historically and culturally diverse representations in novels, novellas, short stories and poems of the sixteenth century to the present. In particular, we will work together to situate literary developments in a social and cultural context and to understand the role of historical and cultural factors that influence the creation and reception of literary texts. In considering lines of influence, traditions, innovation and identity formation, we will keep a focus on the interaction of gender, class and race within the practices of reading and writing. Through group work, presentations, discussions, lectures, research and writing, students will define literary terms, extend critical close reading skills and develop an understanding of the theory and practice of literary criticism. Students will improve research, essay writing and oral presentation skills through in-class exercises that focus on learning to formulate rhetorically effective arguments and structurally effective written assignments. 

English 1A: End of the World Literature | ENGL-1000.3-004 | B. Pomeroy | MWF 10:30 – 11:20

The purpose of this course is to provide a venue for discussion of literary evaluation and technique as well as use End of the World literature as a springboard to cultural and critical literary analysis. The course will look at those texts which write about drastic societal change, such as Fritz Leiber's story "A Pail of Air" and Dale Pendell’s The Great Bay: Chronicles of the Collapse. End of the world texts are both adventure novels, in that they propose a person, or by times groups, pitted against great odds, as well as reflective works. Typically dystopian in intent, they offer the reader more than mere fanciful stories. They examine society in ways that move beyond dire warnings to engage their reader in imaginative dialogues about change.

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-005 | S. Bezan | MW 16:00 – 17:15

This course explores the trope of animal metamorphoses in a range of canonical and contemporary literary forms, including narrative poetry, fairy tales and fables, film, graphic narratives, and fiction. From the transformation of a girl into a tiger in Angela Carter's "The Tiger's Bride" (1979) to the peculiar metamorphosis of a traveling salesman into an insect in Franz Kafka's The Metamorphosis (1915), we investigate how these innovative texts creatively engage with the human/animal divide. In particular, we ask: what kinds of rhetorical strategies, figurative language, and mythological allusions do these authors utilize to reinforce or subvert conventional representations of animality? Analyzing how animals have shaped the literary imagination, this course examines how and why animal metamorphoses take centre stage in texts of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-050 | C. Tosenberger | M 18:00 – 21:00

This course offers an introduction to university-level literary study, including the reading of creative literature (poetry, fiction, or drama); the theory and practice of literary criticism; the role of historical and cultural factors influencing literary texts; and research skills. Students’ writing also receives significant attention.

Intro Topics in Literature: Murder, madness, mystery, and other reading pleasures | ENGL-1003.3-001 | Instructor Z. Izydorczyk | MW 14:30 – 15:45

This course introduces students to reading and writing about creative literature through the study of poems, plays, short stories, and novels about crimes, victims, perpetrators, and their motives. Students will be encouraged to reflect on the meaning of innocence and monstrosity, sanity and madness, reality and fiction, while at the same time exploring a wide range of narrative structures, stylistic conventions, cultural contexts, and literary approaches. Readings will be drawn from past and contemporary literature in a variety of genres, including poems, short stories, novels, plays, and essays. The course will consist of a series of interactive, informal lectures and of discussions in small peer groups. Writing assignments will include in-class responses, a response essay, a mini-research paper, and a full research paper. There will be one mid-term test.

Intro Topics in Literature: Made in Manitoba | ENGL-1003.3-002 | A. Barkman-Hill | TTH 16:00 – 17:15

This course explores a literary landscape as scenic and varied as the physical and human geography of Manitoba. Asking questions of coherence and meaning, students will trace conceptions of place and identity by which we  imagine and re-imagine ourselves. Studying works by Manitoba authors such as Carol Shields, Frederick Philip Grove, Gabrielle Roy, Carol Matas, Patrick Friesen, Sandra Birdsell, Margaret Sweatman,  David Bergen, W.D. Valgardson, Margaret Laurence, Margaret Buffie, Miriam Toews, and Katherine Vermette, emphasis will be placed on reader response and close critical reading with attention to formal elements of fiction and poetry. Notions of gender, class, and ethnicity will be considered as students experiment with reading and writing about literature from various theoretical perspectives and discover within the works of Manitoba writers the joys and sorrows, terror and comedy of writing our own stories. 

Intro Topics in Literature | ENGL-1003.3-003 | C. Petty | TTH 11:30 – 12:45

This course is an introduction to the study of literature focused on works of the twentieth century. It examines what happens to the traditional concept of the hero/heroine in modern and contemporary literature and how that concept is redefined through the lens of modernism.

Conventionally, the leading figure in a play or novel is not only the fulcrum of the action but also its moral focus—the one with whom we are meant to identify. From the courtly knight of medieval romance to the upwardly mobile professional of the nineteenth century novel, fictions have centred on a sympathetic (and generally male) subject. This model was challenged in the twentieth century by the political upheavals of two world wars, and by other events which undermined the confidence of writers and readers in a conventionally heroic protagonist.

The texts we read will reflect this realignment of societal, ethical, and literary expectations.  After an overview of the concept of heroism from Beowulf onward, the course will focus on two short novels (Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness and Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway), a popular graphic novel (V), and poetry and short fiction by W.B. Yeats, D.H. Lawrence, George Orwell, and others.

Intro Reading Culture: Sports and Culture | ENGL-1004.3-001 | A. Burke | TTH 11:30 – 12:45

This course introduces students to the history and practice of cultural studies by examining representations of sport in fiction, film, poetry, memoir, and the graphic novel. The course will consider the themes that generally structure sports narratives as well as investigating the techniques of representation that aim to translate the physical and psychological experience of sport to the page or to the screen. Our investigations will not simply be about the cultural representation of the agonies and ecstasies of sport or of sporting heroics, triumphs, and failures. The course will also consider how the deepest cultural and political questions of the present take shape in and through sport and its representations. From the continuing inequities of race and gender to the troubled identifications of class and nation, sport is a field where the dilemmas and contradictions of the present play out before our eyes.

Tentative reading list: Jeff Lemire’s Essex County, Angie Abdou’s The Bone Cage, Haruki Murakami’s What I Talk About When I Talk About Running, and Claudia Rankine’s Citizen: An American Lyric.

Tentative screening list: Douglas Gordon and Philippe Parreno’s Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait and Brett Kashmere’s From Deep.

Intro Read to Write | ENGL-1005.3-001 | P. Robertson | MW 16:00 – 17:15

This course introduces students to a variety of creative literature from a writerly perspective. This section of Reading to Write Creatively will examine contemporary creative nonfiction, short fiction, and poetry, as well as the many ways of writing within these genres. Students read as writers, closely and actively, learning to hear the nuances, cadences, and signatures of working artists. By reading closely, analyzing, and discussing published texts, we will gain an understanding of the strategies and methods writers use to write effectively. Students’ own writing will also receive significant attention. The course is structured around interactive, informal lectures and discussions in small peer groups, including discussion of students’ own work. Writing assignments will include a short memoir,  a response essay, a poem emulation, and a research paper. This course may be of special interest to students who plan on further work in Creative Writing.

Intro Read to Write | ENGL-1005.3-002 | A. Barkman-Hill | TTH 08:30 – 09:45

This course introduces students to poetry, short fiction, and creative nonfiction from a writerly perspective. Students will explore what it means to read like a writer and will produce critical re- sponses and their own creative works, based on close reading observations. Topics may include the language and structure of poetry, narrative techniques, writing dialogue and other aspects of the art and craft of writing creatively. This course attends to historical and cultural contexts that influence the creation and reception of literary texts and includes an introduction to critical theory. Through reading, analyzing, discussing and writing, students will gain an understanding of the strategies and methods writers use to write effectively. This course may be of special interest to students who plan on further work in creative writing.

FALL/WINTER 2017-18

English 1 | ENGL-1001.6-050 | J. Ball | T 18:00 - 21:00

This class provides students with an introduction to university-level literary study. Together we will study a range of material that suggests the vast diversity of literary work. We will discuss the theory and practice of literary criticism, and the role of historical and cultural factors in the creation and reception of literary work. Students will work to improve writing skills, research topics, and gain an awareness of the historical perspectives and theoretical approaches that inform the study of literature. We will approach literary works with attention to detail, how authors construct texts, and the role of literature in the wider world. Instead of viewing literary texts as coded puzzles which intimidate, we will focus on analysis of their logic and method.

English 1 | ENGL-1001.6-002 | H. Snell | MW 16:00 – 17:15

This course offers a full introduction to university-level literary study, including the reading of creative literature (poetry, fiction, and drama); the theory and practice of literary criticism; the role of historical and cultural factors influencing literary texts; and research skills. Students’ writing also receives significant attention. In this particular version of the course, we begin by considering varying definitions of literature before moving on to reflecting on different genres of literature and the role that literature plays in the larger society. Because literature both helps to shape and is shaped by social movements that have affected how we think about ourselves, our relationship with others, and our environment, we take these into account when we read, effectively factoring context into our interpretation. Authors studied include Marjane Satrapi, Margaret Atwood, Jamaica Kincaid, William Baldwin, Gwendolyn Brooks, Emily Dickinson, William Wordsworth, Derek Walcott, Sylvia Plath, August Wilson, and William Shakespeare.

English 1 | ENGL-1001.6-003 | R. Widdicombe | TTH 8:30 – 9:45

This introductory English course offers a survey of four genres (poetry, short fiction, drama, and the novel) and several historical periods. Course material ranges from Shakespeare’s sonnets to the sonnets of Winnipeg songwriter John K Sampson, and takes us from ancient Greece (Aeschylus’ trilogy The Oresteia) to Winnipeg’s North End, where Katherena Vermette sets her 2016 novel The Break. Students will build close reading skills and confidence in their ability to discuss and write about literature. As we read we will pay careful attention to the relationship between form and content, literary devices, and the cultural forces and historical contexts that shape the text. This course will introduce students to standard theoretical approaches to reading (Marxist, feminist, post-colonial, psychoanalytic, queer theory) and discuss the ways they inform our understanding of the texts. We will consider the way in which literature expands our capacity for empathy, strengthens our critical thinking, and enhances our ability to articulate our own ideas and experiences. Finally, designated classes will be devoted to essay writing skills and research methods.

English 1 | ENGL-1001.6-004 | A. Brickey | MWF 9:30 – 10:20

In this course we’ll encounter a broad range of literary expression, stretching as far back as the fantastical tale of Beowulf, moving through the Middle English period where we’ll meet the mystic Margery Kempe, into the Renaissance where we’ll find Shakespeare and John Donne, to the 18th Century where Swift and Pope reside, onto Victorians like Elizabeth Barrett Browning and George Eliot, and right into the 20th and 21st century. There, we’ll meet experimental modernists like Gertrude Stein and James Joyce, the Beat poets, the postmodernists, and some contemporary writers of today. Along the way, we’ll ask questions such as: why does literature matter and what does art do? Who gets to choose what’s included in the literary “canon”? What kinds of things can different texts tell us about ourselves and the world, and what demands do they make on us as readers? What difference does cultural context make in how we receive literature, and how does a text’s aesthetic form interact with its meaning? This course will be highly participatory and collaborative in nature, and we’ll focus on developing our skills in close reading, thoughtful interpretation, critical writing that makes and defends argumentative claims, and productive class discussion.

English 1: Politics and Literature | ENGL-1001.6-005 | B. Pomeroy | MW 14:30 – 15:45

In this course we will discuss those texts that discuss social change. Many literary texts, on the surface, seem to be merely fanciful stories, but many have been read as wishes for social change. For example, Kim Stanley Robinson’s “A History of the Twentieth Century, with Illustrations” describes the personal aspect of endless war and Lars Eighner’s “Dumpster Diving” questions the materialism of western society. As well, short story collections like Thomas King’s One Good Story that One and novels such as Jeanette Winterson’s Stone Gods use fantastic visions and brief portraits to question the effect of class structures, censorship, the position of women in society, environmental deterioration and governmental control. We will also be reading poems, such as Harry Chapin’s “The Rock” and Tom Waits’ “Invitation to the Blues” and viewing films like The Age of Stupid and An Inconvenient Truth.

English 1 | ENGL-1001.6-006 | A. Brickey | MWF 13:30 – 14:20

In this course we’ll encounter a broad range of literary expression, stretching as far back as the fantastical tale of Beowulf, moving through the Middle English period where we’ll meet the mystic Margery Kempe, into the Renaissance where we’ll find Shakespeare and John Donne, to the 18th Century where Swift and Pope reside, onto Victorians like Elizabeth Barrett Browning and George Eliot, and right into the 20th and 21st century. There, we’ll meet experimental modernists like Gertrude Stein and James Joyce, the Beat poets, the postmodernists, and some contemporary writers of today. Along the way, we’ll ask questions such as: why does literature matter and what does art do? Who gets to choose what’s included in the literary “canon”? What kinds of things can different texts tell us about ourselves and the world, and what demands do they make on us as readers? What difference does cultural context make in how we receive literature, and how does a text’s aesthetic form interact with its meaning? This course will be highly participatory and collaborative in nature, and we’ll focus on developing our skills in close reading, thoughtful interpretation, critical writing that makes and defends argumentative claims, and productive class discussion.

English 1 | ENGl-1001.6-250 | R. Younka | WEC

Description TBA

WINTER 2018

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-006 | C. Petty | TTH 16:00 – 17:15

English 1A is an introduction to the historical study of literature in English.  This course will examine texts from the twelfth to the twentieth century and present material from the genres of fiction, drama, and poetry.

The class will focus on classic notions of the structure and language of literature but will also emphasize the rhetorical components of narrative, those elements which create patterns and codes to which the reader responds.  Assignments will challenge you not only to reflect the ways of reading developed in class but also to develop your own understanding of the texts and to recognize how published scholarship can help refine that understanding.

Although we will emphasize the individual qualities of each text, we will also examine the ways in which an author both reflects and challenges the cultural and social expectation of his/her time.  The choice of materials will allow us to chart the ways that different authors and periods have responded to issues of attraction, courtship/romance, and marriage.

The course will be taught primarily through lectures, group discussion, and question and answer.  We will use short video examples that demonstrate how longer narratives have been presented or represented to an audience.

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-007 | J. Jacobson-Konefall | TTH 13:00 – 14:15

Description TBA

English 1A | ENGL-1000.3-008 | J. Jacobson-Konefall | MWF 10:30 – 11:20

Description TBA

Intro Topics in Literature: Literature in the Days of the Internet | ENGL-1003.3-004 | B. Pomeroy | MW 16:00 – 17:15

Now that the internet has become nearly ubiquitous, it is starting to have an effect on the way that we receive and consider texts. In this course we will explore how writers from the past have discussed the effect of the internet on society (such as E. M. Forster in his "The Machine Stops" and H. G. Wells in World Brain) as well as examine fictional visions of these future trends such as Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49 and Charles Stross' Accelerando. This course will be a discussion-based analysis and a critically informed evaluation of the techniques writers have used to present their understanding of the changing face of literature. I hope that this course draws those students who are as interested in the future of the internet's effects as they are in using the resource itself.

Intro Topics in Literature: Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know: A Survey of Literary Bad Boys and Femmes Fatales| ENGL-1003.3-005 | K. Ready | TTH 14:30 – 15:45

This course introduces students to a variety of creative literature (poetry, drama, and/or fiction) through the lens of a particular theme, genre, nationality or period. Each section is a uniquely designed introduction to university-level literary study. 

This particular section of Introduction to English: Topics in Literature, subtitled “Mad, Bad, and Dangerous to Know: A Survey of Literary Bad Boys and Femmes Fatales,” explores the intertwining histories of two major literary figures: the bad boy or homme fatal and the bad girl or femme fatale. Both of these figures recur throughout literary history, flourishing particularly in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Through a select survey of poetry, fiction, and drama, concentrated in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, this course will explore the origins, defining characteristics, and development of the figures of the fatal man and woman. In the course of class discussion, students will be introduced to critical theory, with emphasis on historicist, feminist, psychoanalytic, and post-colonial approaches.

Intro Topics in Literature: Utopias and Dystopias | ENGL-1003.3-006 | K. Venema | TTH 10:00 – 11:15

Description TBA

Intro Reading Culture: Recycling Culture | ENGL-1004.3-002 | B. Cornellier | T 08:30 – 11:15

In this section of the course, students shall explore the changing roles of representation and cultural production in our mass-mediated societies. More specifically, this course considers original ways cultural texts are created from diverse practices of adaptation, appropriation, and recoding of existing cultural material, ranging from Alfred Hitchcock and Oscar Wilde to British Punk, the femme fatale, and the beheading of John the Baptist. By introducing some of the key concepts in cultural theory, this course shall provide students with an opportunity to expand their understanding of different textual practices and modes of cultural production, including theatre, cinema, visual arts, popular culture and subcultural production, and the new digital and web media. Our focus will be on the complex chains of production linking texts, cultural contexts, and audiences/readers together. As a result, students will be invited to challenge some of their more deeply ingrained understandings of what readers, consumers, and artists do with culture.

Intro Reading Culture: Victorian and Neo-Victorian Fiction | ENGL-1004.3-003 | C. Manfredi | MWF 11:30 – 12:20

The term “Neo-Victorian” refers to our contemporary re-engagement of everything related to the Victorian era (1832-1901), such as literature, authors, painting, or even fashion. Most contemporary views of the Victorian era are derived from fictional narratives and their film and television adaptations. In this course, we will read a selection of four classic Victorian novels and examine the ways in which these influential texts have been re-imagined through neo-Victorian film adaptations. Victorian fiction runs the gamut from young governesses in Gothic households to vampires in London and the world’s most famous consulting detective. Throughout this course, students will grapple with the following questions about this enduring time period and its literary legacy: what arguments do neo-Victorian adaptations make about the Victorian era? Why do we still read Victorian fiction? What meanings do Victorian representations of gender, sexuality, race, and science hold for a contemporary audience?

Tentative reading list: Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre; Robert Louis Stevenson’s Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Bram Stoker’s Dracula; Arthur Conan Doyle’s A Study in Scarlet.

Tentative film list: Stephen Frear’s Mary Reilly (1996); Francis Ford Coppola’s Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1992); Cary Fukunaga’s Jane Eyre (2011); Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes (2009). 

Intro Reading Culture: Graphic Novels | ENGL-1004.3-004 | C. Rifkind | TTH 13:00 – 14:15

This course introduces students to the diverse and vibrant storytelling worlds of graphic novels. We will read a range of literary genres, including coming-of-age fiction, auto/biography, gothic horror, and speculative fiction, all in the form of comic books. Lectures and discussions will teach students the specific terminology and foundational theories of comics studies, an interdisciplinary field that draws on literary studies, cultural studies, media and communication studies, art history, and film studies. We will also pay attention to the similarities and differences between comics, literature, and film, especially when we study film adaptations of the graphic novels. Assignments include a sequence analysis (close reading), a research essay portfolio leading up to a research essay, in-class work, and a final exam. Students need no prior exposure to comics or graphic novels, just a willingness to treat them seriously as literary and cultural objects, and a curiosity about how to analyze their unique features. Students should be prepared to discuss serious historical, political, and cultural subjects, such as the Holocaust and violence against women, in a popular form that is also often visually pleasurable. Check the UW Bookstore for required texts.

Intro Read to Write | ENGL-1005.3-003 | J. Scoles | MW 16:00 – 17:15

This course introduces students to a variety of creative literature from a writerly perspective. This section of Reading to Write Creatively will examine short fiction and poetry, specifically, as well as the many ways of writing within the two genres. Students read as writers, closely and actively, learning to hear the nuances, cadences, and signatures of working artists. By reading closely, analyzing, and discussing published texts, students will gain an understanding of the strategies and methods writers use to write effectively. This course may be of special interest to students who plan on further work in Creative Writing.

Intro Read to Write | ENGL-1005.3-005 | M. Sweatman | TTH 11:30 – 12:45

This course introduces students to creative literature (poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction) from a writerly perspective. Our readings will pertain to war and adventure from male and female perspectives. You will explore and analyze the methods writers use to build imaginary constructs. Topics of analysis will include poetic and referential language, dramatic structure, narrative and stylistic techniques, and the writers’ methods of making philosophical, political, and psychological concepts vivid and active.

Classes will be comprised of short lectures followed by discussion. You must come to class with the appropriate text in hand, and be prepared for discussion, and also for in-class tests pertaining to our texts. You will write one in-class essay, and two research essays requiring secondary sources. The essays are designed to introduce you to the practice of literary criticism, and to develop your writing and research skills. There is one creative assignment, for which you may write short fiction or poetry; this project requires an annotated bibliography to demonstrate creative research. There will be a final exam comprised of two essays.