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Urban and Inner City Studies

Courses Available - Fall 2017


DECOLONIZATION AND RESURGENCE
UIC-1002-001 (3) Friday 9:30am-12:45pm
527 Selkirk Ave

This course will explore the concepts of colonization, decolonization, and resurgence in Canada, focusing especially on Indigenous trailblazers and writing historically as well as in the contemporary context. Sites and themes of resistance to be explored include Indigenous gender, sexuality, spirituality, Indigenous feminisms and masculinities, as well as issues specific to youth. Attention will be given to politicized, creative, and academic writing (among other forms) across a range of genres in response to, in defiance of, and apart from the Canadian (and broader) colonial situation. Classes will be based on lectures, class discussions, and readings.

COMMUNITY ADVOCACY INTERNSHIP
UIC-3220-001 (6) Thursday 1:00-3:34pm plus internship
Merchants Corner

Apprenticeship/Internship/Practicum | 1.5 hrs Seminar/Discussion) This course closely examines selected urban poverty-related issues, from a legal, policy and advocacy perpective. Particular emphasis is placed on appeal mechanisms related to administrative tribunals. Issues examined may vary from year to year, and may include but are not limited to: employment and income assistance; employment insurance; housing; mental health. Central to the course is an internship with an organization that supports citizens making complaints and appeals related to these areas. Students learn about appeal processes through involvement in actual cases.

URBAN AND INNER-CITY STUDIES
UIC-1001-002 (3) Wednesday 9:30am-12:15pm
527 Selkirk Avenue

How and why do cities grow and change? What are the consequences, especially for those most marginalized? How did Winnipeg, specifically, become the city it is today? What exciting inner-city initiatives are underway? This is the foundational course for Urban & Inner-City Studies. It includes two very interesting field trips.

Shauna MacKinnon has years of experience coordinating and conducting research in Winnipeg’s inner city as the former Director of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives-Manitoba. She has published extensively on inner city issues, and works closely with inner city organizations. She directs the Capacity Building stream of the Manitoba Research Alliance’s large, SSHRC-funded inner city and Aboriginal research project, coordinates the MRA’s new international research initiatives, and recently accepted, along with Diane Roussin, Executive Director of Ma Mawi, a prestigious international award for building university-community connections.

INTRO TO URBAN AND INNER-CITY STUDIES
UIC-1001-001 (3) Tuesday 9:30am-12:15pm
527 Selkirk Avenue

How and why do cities grow and change? What are the consequences, especially for those most marginalized? How did Winnipeg, specifically, become the city it is today? What exciting inner-city initiatives are underway? This is the foundational course for Urban & Inner-City Studies. It includes two very interesting field trips.

Jim Silver has worked in and written about the inner city for many years. Among his recent books are: Good Places to Live: Poverty and Public Housing in Canada (2011); Moving Forward, Giving Back: Transformative Aboriginal Adult Education (2013); and as co-author, Indians Wear Red: Colonialism, Resistance and Aboriginal Street Gangs, which will be released this Fall. Jim represents UIC in the North End community’s efforts to redevelop the old Merchants Hotel into the new and multifaceted Merchants Corner, which will be an exciting new home for UIC in the near future. Jim will be teaching UIC’s Practicum this year.

POVERTY AND THE LAW
UIC-3240-050 (3) Wednesday 5:30-8:15pm
3M60

Instructor: Byron Williams & Joëlle Pastora Sala

How does the law affect low-income people? Does our legal system disadvantage the poor? If so, how? And how can the law be used to advance the interests of low-income people? This course develops students’ insight into a fundamental part of our society.

Byron Williams is the Executive Director of the Public Interest Law Centre. He has played a lead role in conducting test case litigation in poverty law and human rights. Among his very many achievements, Byron has been successful in legal cases that have: prevented termination of the tenancies of low-income renters in the middle of winter; set the lowest interest rate cap on payday lenders in Canada; and improved tenants’ access to benefits under the Social Allowances Act. His course, Poverty and the Law, draws on his vast experience in using the law to promote social justice.


For further details about this course, search WebAdvisor, or use the Course Calendar along with the Timetable

For information on how to register for this course please see Registration Process and Procedures.