Search

History

Courses Available - Fall 2017


HISTORY OF CHILDHOOD IN CANADA
HIST-3572-001 (6) Tuesday / Thursday 4:00-5:15pm
3M60

This course traces the history of childhood in Canada from the pre-industrial period to the late-twentieth century. It explores how new ideals of childhood which emerged in the late-nineteenth century differed from those existing previously and how an ideal of the child as dependent and in need of careful nurture and protection gradually took hold. It explores these subjects via a consideration of a number of issues which, from year to year, may include work, schooling, health, adoption, delinquency, recreation, and the emergence of children as a target consumer market.

HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY
HIST-2901-050 (6) Tuesday / Thursday 6-9pm
1L07

A survey of developments in technology, from ancient to modern times. Throughout, there will be a consideration of the relationship of technology to man.

EUROPEAN ART
HIST-2800-050 (6) Wednesday 6-9pm
1L07

The historical development of art forms in the European tradition will be studied in successive eras. Emphasis is given to painting, sculpture, and architecture.

RUSSIA SINCE 1917
HIST-2326-001 (6) Tuesday / Thursday 2:30-3:45PM
1RC014

This course provides a survey of Russian history and civilization since the Bolshevik Revolution. Topics include the formation of the Soviet state, Stalinism, World War II, the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and the emergence of the new Russia. Important cultural and political personalities discussed include Lenin, Stalin, Khrushchev, Gorbachev, Solzhenitsyn, and Shostakovich.

RUSSIA TO 1917
HIST-2325-001 (6) Tuesday / Thursday 11:30-12:45PM
4CM13

This course provides a survey of Russian history and civilization from 800 to 1917. Topics include the founding of the Russian state, the Tsarist Empire and the Revolutions of 1917. Important political and cultural personalities discussed include Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, Tchaikowsky, Tolstoy, and Lenin.

WAR AS A SOCIAL INSTITUTION
HIST-2112 001 (6) Monday / Wednesday 1L07
1L07

This course offers a survey of the effects of war on the development of Western society, and the reciprocal effects of social forces on the art of war, from the ancient Greeks to the Nuclear Age.

20TH CENTURY WORLD
HIST-2110-001 (6) Monday / Wednesday / Friday 10:30-11:20AM
3BC55

This course offers an historical approach to the characteristic problems, new or inherited, of the twentieth century, e.g., problems of industrialism; nationalism; balance of power; racial conflicts; imperial rivalries; origins, character, and results of World War I; totalitarian experiments; the Second World War; problems of the post-war period; the contemporary world-scene; the United Nations' difficulties and achievements.

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES FROM 1607
HIST-2600-050 (6) Tuesday / Thursday 6:00-9:00PM
2M73

This course is a survey of the development of the American people and their institutions from colonial times to the present day.

HISTORY OF SEXUALITY
HIST-2327 001 (3) Monday / Wednesday 4:00-5:15PM
5L24

By tracing the historical evolution of a variety of themes, such as aphrodisiacs, reproductive theories, the sex trade, and policies on public health, this course will offer a survey of sexuality from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. The focus will be on the Renaissance, the Protestant Reformation, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the Industrial Revolution, with a critical look at these historical periods as watersheds in the history of sexuality. Though references will be made to other regions for comparative purposes, the focus of this course is on Western Europe.

HISTORY OF BRITIAN
HIST-2302-001 (3) Monday / Wednesday / Friday 8:30-9:20AM
2M77

This lecture course is a survey of the United Kingdom's history from the Congress of Vienna (1815) to the fall of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher (1990). Lectures focus on the political, social, and imperial history of the period. Major themes include: industrialization and the rise of a class society; political activism and suffrage reform; social policy from the New Poor Law to the Welfare State; and the growth, decline and legacy of Britain's empire.

THE ATLANTIC WORLD: EUROPE AND THE AMERICAS, 1700-1989
HIST-1015-001 (3) Monday / Wednesday / Friday 1:30-2:20PM
2M72

This course introduces students to the broad forces involved in the making of the Atlantic World with a particular focus on social, economic, and political transformations. Major themes may include political revolutions from the 18th (French and American) to the 20th century (Russian); slavery and abolitionism, industrialization, urbanization, and immigration; the family and changing roles of women; race, imperialism, and colonialism; war and its social legacies; the state, welfare, and human rights. Students are also introduced to the basics of historical research such as the examination of historical evidence and interpretations, comparative analysis, and bibliographic and narrative skills.


For further details about this course, search WebAdvisor, or use the Course Calendar along with the Timetable.

For information on how to register for this course please see Registration Process and Procedures.