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Courses Available - Winter 2017


NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART IN CONTEXT
HIST-3809-001 (3) Monday 2:30 - 5:15PM
3M67

This lecture/seminar course focuses on the major artistic movements of Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism within the context of the social and political upheavals of the late eighteenth and nineteenth century. This course explores the relations between popular culture and the fine art of the ruling class, between ideology and artistic practice, between the revolution of the avant-garde and of the people, and among industry, exploitation, and empire, and between women as artists and as subjects of art.

Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-3804 | HIST-3817 | HIST-3818.

MENNONITES IN CANADA
HIST-3541-001 (3) Thursday 1:00-2:15PM
1D10

This course will survey major developments in Canadian Mennonite communities from 1786 to the present. It will trace the following themes: the Swiss American and Russian roots of Canadian Mennonites; community formation in Ontario and Western Canada; Anabaptism in every day life (especially the way it was played out in the family); theological developments in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; the survival of Mennonite faith distinctives in the urban and socially-integrated Canadian society since World War II. Special emphasis will be placed on establishing the unique features of Canadian Mennonite experience. Cross-listed: MENN-3541(3).

Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and MENN-3541.

SLAVES, SERFS, AND SERVANTS IN PRE-MODERN EUROPE
HIST-3225-050 (3) Wednesday 6:00-9:00PM
3M60

This part-lecture, part-seminar course examines the multi-faceted dimensions of servility in pre-Modern Europe. Through the lens of primary and secondary sources, students gain an appreciation for the varied mechanisms under which women and men, young and old, were indentured in pre-industrial societies, and develop a critical understanding of the ideologies that justified the categorization of humankind along their servile status. The time frame and geographical focus may vary from year to year, but the course content covers primarily the institutions of slavery and other forms of servitude in Western Europe, c.1400-c.1700. Students are expected to read primary and secondary sources, and participate actively in course discussions.

WOMEN IN MEDIEVAL EUROPE, 800-1350
HIST-3220-050 (3) Mnoday 6:00-9:00PM
3M60

This lecture/seminar course will examine the varied experiences of women in medieval Europe. Specific themes may include such topics as women's contributions to religious life and intellectual reform, the changing political and legal status of women in feudal society, women's participation in agrarian and market economies, and the construction of gender and sexuality as class experiences in the medieval period. Using primary and secondary sources, comparisons will be drawn where appropriate among different regions and times.

SURVEY HISTORY OF CANADA: THE MODERN ERA, 1939 TO THE PRESENT
HIST-2505-002 (3) M/W/F 1:30 - 2:20PM
3M63

This course surveys the economic, social, and political history of Canada from the beginning of World War II to the recent past. Themes may include the rise and decline of the welfare state in Canada; the political and constitutional developments that facilitated it; and the challenges to it from French-Canadian nationalism, regional protest movements, and socialism; Canada's participation in World War II, its place in postwar international relations, and its shift in dependence from Great Britain to the United States.

SURVEY HISTORY OF CANADA: THE NATIONAL ERA, 1867-1939
HIST-2504-002 (3) Wednesday 4:00-5:15PM
3D01

This course surveys the economic,social, and political history of Canada from the formation of the Canadian state in the mid-nineteenth century to the beginning of World War II. Themes may include the constitutional achievement of the nation state, westward expansion and relations with Indigenous peoples, the creation of a national political economy and the social relations which developed within it, immigration and ethnic relations, the rise of political dissent and socialism, questions of political rights and citizenship, French-Canadian nationalism and regionalism.

Restrictions: Students may not hold credit for this course and HIST-2500 | HIST-2503.

EUROPE SINCE 1945
HIST-2330-050 (3) Thursday 6:00 - 9:00PM
3M63

This course provides a survey of eastern and western European history since the end of World War II. It covers the Cold War, the development of the European Common Market and the European Union, the Collapse of Communism and changes in Europe since then. Political, social, economic, and cultural topics are included. The role of important personalities such as Charles de Gaulle, Willi Brandt, Josip Tito, Lech Walesa and Mikhail Gorbachev are considered.

ANTI-SEMITISM AND THE HOLOCAUST
HIST-2328-050 (3) Wednesday 6:00-9:00PM
1L08

This course studies the origins and execution of Hitler's "Final Solution" against the backdrop of 2000 years of European Anti-Semitism. Although the major focus of the course will be on the tragic events of 1933-45, contemporary topics such as Neo-Nazism and other genocides will be briefly addressed as well.


For further details about this course, search WebAdvisor, or use the Course Calendar along with the Timetable.

For information on how to register for this course please see Registration Process and Procedures.