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Anthropology

Courses Available - Winter 2017


SOUTH AMERICAN LANGUAGES
ANTH-4411-002 (3) Monday / Wednesday / Friday 11:30AM - 12:20PM
3M60

Presenting an integrated overview of the indigenous languages of South America, this course looks at main language families spoken there, their spatial distribution, history and classification, as well as their cultural background. With 53 language families and 55 isolates, South America is not only the most diverse region in linguistic terms, but also a storehouse of unusual structural features important for understanding the full range of possible variants of human language. The course also explores typological characteristics of South American languages, potential linguistic areas, proposals of more distant relationships, and the current situation of endangered languages in this region. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000-level. Cross-listed: ANTH-3411(3), LING-3104(3), LING-4104(3), and IS-3104(3).

SOUTH AMERICAN LANGUAGES
ANTH-3411-002 (3) Monday / Wednesday / Friday 11:30AM - 12:20PM
3M60

Presenting an integrated overview of the indigenous languages of South America, this course looks at main language families spoken there, their spatial distribution, history and classification, as well as their cultural background. With 53 language families and 55 isolates, South America is not only the most diverse region in linguistic terms, but also a storehouse of unusual structural features important for understanding the full range of possible variants of human language. The course also explores typological characteristics of South American languages, potential linguistic areas, proposals of more distant relationships, and the current situation of endangered languages in this region. Additional in-depth work is required to receive credit at the 4000-level. Cross-listed: ANTH-4411(3), LING-3104(3), LING-4104(3), and IS-3104(3).

RACE CONCEPTS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH-4310-001 (3) Monday / Wednesday 04:00PM - 05:15PM
2C14

Much of the early history of the discipline of anthropology was geared towards understanding biological and behavioural differences between "races". Today this type of research has fallen out of favour, with the very existence of distinct biological races coming into question. This seminar course explores some of the key debates about the race concept in physical anthropology. The emphasis is on fostering critical reading of primary sources, and engendering active discussion on these issues in an open and non-judgmental environment. Cross-listed: ANTH-3310(3).

Prerequisites: ANTH-2300 or permission of the instructor.

RACE CONCEPTS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH-3310-001 (3) Monday / Wednesday 04:00PM - 05:15PM
2C14

Much of the early history of the discipline of anthropology was geared towards understanding biological and behavioural differences between "races". Today this type of research has fallen out of favour, with the very existence of distinct biological races coming into question. This seminar course explores some of the key debates about the race concept in physical anthropology. The emphasis is on fostering critical reading of primary sources, and engendering active discussion on these issues in an open and non-judgmental environment. Cross-listed: ANTH-3310(3).

Prerequisites: ANTH-2300 or permission of the instructor.

ETHNOHISTORIC METHOD/THEORY
ANTH-4117-001 (3) Wednesday 02:30PM - 05:15PM
3M65

Ethnohistory combines ethnographic and historical methods to study changes in cultures over time. In this course students gain a theoretical understanding of ethnohistory through a series of readings that explore differences between oral and written texts. They also gain a practical understanding of the discipline through the transcription of an oral text, which is contextualized through library and/or archival research. Cross-listed: ANTH-3117(3), HIST-3526(3) and HIST-4526(3).

Prerequisites: ANTH-2100 or permission of the instructor.

ETHNOHISTORIC METHOD/THEORY
ANTH-3117-001 (3) Wednesday 02:30PM - 05:15PM
3M65

Ethnohistory combines ethnographic and historical methods to study changes in cultures over time. In this course students gain a theoretical understanding of ethnohistory through a series of readings that explore differences between oral and written texts. They also gain a practical understanding of the discipline through the transcription of an oral text, which is contextualized through library and/or archival research. Cross-listed: ANTH-3117(3), HIST-3526(3) and HIST-4526(3).

Prerequisites: ANTH-2100 or permission of the instructor.

APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH-3103-001 (3) Monday 1-4 PM

This is a course in the identification and resolution of social problems using anthropological knowledge and technique. Various approaches including community development and community organization are considered for rural and urban settings.

Prerequisites: ANTH-1001 or ANTH-1002 or permission of the instructor.


For further details about this course, search WebAdvisor, or use the Course Calendar along with the Timetable

For information on how to register for this course please see Registration Process and Procedures.